Popular
Points
51K
WestMidlandsWeAre
Launch date: July 2017
Combined FreeTimePays following: 101K


Community sponsors:

Art, culture & creativity
21 Apr 2020 - FreeTimePays
Introducing

Introducing Creatives We Are

https://www.youtube.com/embed//Luk0Np2dN7s

Creatives We Are is the largest community-led collaboration ever launched by any city as a way of engaging and inspiring its Creative Community.  It is an initaitive of Birmingham We Are & The Birmingham Contemporary Art Gallery.

Let's collaborate! Take the article.  If you love arts and culture, connect with us. 

 

Related View community

Introducing Creatives We Are





Creatives We Are is the largest community-led collaboration ever launched by any city as a way of engaging and inspiring its Creative Community.  It is an initaitive of Birmingham We Are & The Birmingham Contemporary Art Gallery.

Let's collaborate! Take the article.  If you love arts and culture, connect with us. 

 


As well as leading a collaborative push that will benefit all creatives, the Creatives We Are programme of initiatives supports a massive drive to generate over £10 million in social value for Birmingham and the Midlands.

If you are a creative with passion, register here. 

If you love the arts, culture and creativity and you're looking to brand your business as a supporter of creativity, let's chat.  Call 0121 410 5520 or email jonathan@creativesWeAre.com.

If you're a funder of the arts, creativity or culture or you're a philanthropist we'd love to share our plans with you.  

Here's a very brief introduction to our collaborations and our programmes running online through 2020, and, when restrictions over social distancing are lifted, offline as well. 

First, our 5 collaborations. 

Birmingham Gems

In the largest community collaboration ever attempted by any city, we are mapping and tracking all that is great about Birmingham.

This digital space maintained with the help of community will continue to grow as a reference point for both visitors and residents to maximise their Birmingham experience by engaging with more places, more passions and most importantly, more people. View in development site here.

Art and Culture Trail

Imagine a trail of the city’s wonderful art and culture, with content supplied by community, mapped for ease of access and employing the latest technology such as virtual reality for maximum effect and reach.

That’s exactly what is being built in conjunction with the work being carried out in mapping and tracking our Birmingham Gems.

This totally unique collaboration involves over 100 different organisations and more than 1,000 people with creative passion across the community.

Photographers share the passion! Share yours!

Covid-19 just can’t stop people sharing their love for their City. Whether from their archive or from their restricted daily walk, we’re carrying on sharing all the great images of the City and its neighbourhoods.

Our first video in the Creatives We Are series was a huge success and now we invite anyone to send us their photos taken in or out of the City Centre. It can be of your favourite green and open spaces, an example of Birmingham’s great history or heritage, an example of modern or classic architecture, or a magical moment down along the canal.

A number of photos will then be selected for inclusion in one of our videos and following the restrictions we will be laying on an exhibition of all photography at The Birmingham Contemporary Art Gallery with some very special awards from some very special people who love Birmingham as much as we do.

Architecture and Us

Architecture And Us is the place to go to see the very best of Birmingham’s architecture. From the classics to the modern builds, we’re mapping them all, providing visitors and people who work and live in the city with a fantastic showcase of great architecture.

The site offers the huge number of creatives a place to engage and access an array of tools for sharing their passion for architecture.

View in development site here

It’s Your Build

It’s Your Build is a digital platform for showcasing Birmingham’s construction sector and its built environment and offers the huge number of creatives a place to engage and access an array of tools for sharing their passion for what is being built in the city.

Everything’s mapped from the application to the final build with content provided by and shared by people who love what’s going up in Birmingham.

View the site here.

And now our 4 programmes. 

Creatives Online

Whether it’s creative ideas you’re after or you’re just interested in joining in on a creative social, we’re building a list of all the online events run by creatives across Birmingham and the region.

Creativity and Wellness

A series of workshops and tools (online and offline) designed and delivered by our growing network of creative consultants and therapists. 

On the Edge of Art

First to run in ‘The Creative Edge’ series of community collaborations bringing out the creative in all of us is On the Edge of Art. 

Pitch Creative

Regular opportunities for Creatives to pitch their ideas or their amazing skills to those with the potential, the funding and the resources to change lives. Running on-line and off-line (when restrictions over social distancing relaxed). 

Contact us for further details on any of our collaborations or creative programmes or should you have a creative initiative you are thinking of running or have a venture you would like to discuss with us, we’d be delighted to hear from you.

Jonathan, Albert or Sarah can be contacted at admin@creativesWeAre.com or call 0121 410 5520.

Share  Connect with us
90 passion points
History & heritage
20 Apr 2020 - Elliott Brown
Inspiration

Pharoah: King of Egypt from the British Museum to the Gas Hall in the summer of 2012

While the Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery has their own collection of Ancient Egypt artefacts, back in the summer of 2012, there was a touring exhibition from the British Museum called Pharoah: King of Egypt. I saw it in the Gas Hall during August 2012. The ticket at the time was £5 to enter. Lots of Ancient Egypt figures and sculptures to see. Over 130 objects from London.

Related View community

Pharoah: King of Egypt from the British Museum to the Gas Hall in the summer of 2012





While the Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery has their own collection of Ancient Egypt artefacts, back in the summer of 2012, there was a touring exhibition from the British Museum called Pharoah: King of Egypt. I saw it in the Gas Hall during August 2012. The ticket at the time was £5 to enter. Lots of Ancient Egypt figures and sculptures to see. Over 130 objects from London.


I like seeing Ancient Egypt sculptures / heads / sarcophagus's in museums, and the Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery had a touring exhibition at the Gas Hall from the 14th July to the 14th October 2012 called Pharoah: King of Egypt (the original webpage is now deleted but is archived at the Wayback Machine).

Pharaoh: King of Egypt is a national touring exhibition from the British Museum which explores the lives of the ancient kings of Egypt.  

Over 130 British Museum objects, which have never been seen out of London before, feature in this exhibition – from monumental sculptures to intimate items of gold jewellery. 

Displayed alongside a selection of Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery’s own Egyptian collection, this exhibition is incredibly diverse, spanning over 3,000 years of history. 

The exhibition will give visitors of all ages the chance to explore the myths and realities of kingship in ancient Egypt.

The tickets at the time was: Adults: £5, Concession (students, senior citizens, children aged 3 to 16): £4 and Family: £15.

My visit was on the 17th August 2012.

One of the information signs about Pharaoh King of Egypt as you go in.

Goddess Sekhmet

Made of Granite. Originally in Karnak, Thebes, Egypt. 1390 - 1352 BC.

Pharoah Ramses II

This is part of a granite statue of Pharoah Ramses II. 1279 - 1213 BC. Originally from Temple of Khnum, Elephantine, Egypt.

Ra-Horakhty

This is Ra-Horakhty. Granite statue of the god. 1279 - 1213 BC. Tell el-Maskhuta, Egypt.

Pharoah Amenemhat IV

A sphinx of Pharoah Amenemhat IV. 1808 - 1799 BC. Beirut, Lebanon. 

Temple Inscription

It originally bore the name of Pharoah Senusret III, but 600 years later the royal titles of Pharoah Ramses II (1279 - 1213 BC). Originally dated 1874 - 1855 BC. Bubastis, Egypt.

Stela of Tjetji

Two tablets - Stela of Tjetji. Limestone - 2125 - 2055 BC. Thebes, Egypt.

This is the upper tablet.

This is the lower tablet.

Pharoah Ramses IX

Limestone ostracon with Pharoah Ramses IX on it. 1126 - 1108 BC. Valley of the Kings, Thebes, Egypt.

Granodiorite stone statue of Senenmut

This is a Granodiorite stone statue of Senenmut. 1479 - 1472 BC. Karnak, Thebes, Egypt. She is holding Princess Neferura only daughter of Pharoah Tuthmosis II and Hatshepsut.

Wooden bed

Wooden bed with gold and silver decoration 1126 - 1069 BC. Tomb of the Pharoah Ramses IX. Valley of the Kings, Thebes, Egypt.

Pharoah Ramses I

Statue of Pharoah Ramses I. Tomb guardian statue from the Tomb of the Pharoah Ramses I. Wooden standing figure. 1295 - 1294 BC. Valley of the Kings, Thebes, Egypt.

Death objects

At the top is a Papyrus account of a trial for robbery. At the bottom left is a limestone painted relief fragment. The Faience Shabti figure of Pharoah Seti I is in the middle at the bottom. Shabtis, the wooden royal shabti figure is on the bottom right.  More details below with the close up photos. 

Limestone painted relief fragment

Dating to about 1294 - 1279 BC. Tomb of Pharoah Seti I, Valley of the Kings, Thebes, Egypt.

Papyrus account of a trial for robbery

It dates to 1186 - 1069 BC, Egypt.

Shabtis - Faience Shabti figure of Pharoah Seti I

It dates to about 1294 - 1279 BC.  Valley of the Kings, Thebes, Egypt.

Shabtis - Wooden royal shabti figure

This one dates to about 1295 - 1186 BC. Valley of the Kings, Thebes, Egypt.

Coffin of Namenkhetamun

This is a Coffin of Namenkhetamun. Made in Thebes around 600 BC.

Dress like an Ancient Egyptian

There was clothes on a rack to the left that kids could put on an look like an Ancient Egyptian. Maybe even have their photo taken with this picture on the wall.

Unfinished statue of a Ptolemaic pharoah

This was an unfinished basalt statue of a Ptolemaic pharoah. 305 - 30 BC. Athribis, Egypt.

Green schist of Pharoah Mentuhotep VI

This small statue was a Green schist of Pharoah Mentuhotep VI. 1795 - 1650 BC. Karnak, Thebes, Egypt.

Inebny

This is a limestone block  of Inebny. 1479 - 1425 BC. Thebes, Egypt.

Head from statue of Pharoah Mentuhotep III

This is a head from statue of Pharoah Mentuhotep III. 2055 - 2004 BC. Temple of Mentuhotep III. Deir el-Bahri, Thebes, Egypt. Sandstone.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Now at over 1,110 followers. Thank you.

Birmingham We Are People with Passion award winner 2020

Share  Connect with us
40 passion points
Green open spaces
17 Apr 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

The outer fringes of Sutton Park during 2017

I went to Sutton Coldfield a couple of times back in 2017. The first time in January 2017 to look around the Town Centre, then by August 2017 on The Big Sleuth bear hunt. So in January only skimmed the park from the road, and in August only popped in to find the bear they had there. On the way saw a couple of lakes. I've not yet been deep into Sutton Park, maybe one day in the future?

Related View community

The outer fringes of Sutton Park during 2017





I went to Sutton Coldfield a couple of times back in 2017. The first time in January 2017 to look around the Town Centre, then by August 2017 on The Big Sleuth bear hunt. So in January only skimmed the park from the road, and in August only popped in to find the bear they had there. On the way saw a couple of lakes. I've not yet been deep into Sutton Park, maybe one day in the future?


In 2017 I go the train to Sutton Coldfield on two different occasions. In January 2017 mainly to have a photo walk around Sutton Coldfield Town Centre. I returned in August 2017 for The Big Sleuth. I didn't go in 2015 for The Big Hoot as didn't want to do Sutton Coldfield for scratch with the owl sculptures as well. Although by 2017 there were some left to see in the Royal Town.

There was at least one bear in the summer of 2017 to see in Sutton Park. Once I got that, I walked towards Boldmere for the others (heading back into the town by Wylde Green and Maney finishing the trail at the Empire Cinema).

I also saw Sutton Park from the plane I was on, coming into land at Birmingham Airport around June 2017.

 

Some history of Sutton Park, taken from the Wikipedia page (link above). It is one of the largest urban parks in the UK. It is the largest country park in Birmingham (the Lickey Hills is second largest and Woodgate Valley is third largest) at 971.25 hectares (2,400 acres). Most of the park is a National Nature Reserve and parts of it is a Scheduled Ancient Monument. The Sutton Park railway line goes through the park. There is several pools of water located within Sutton Park, used for boating in some of them.

 

January 2017

I didn't go into Sutton Park on the 22nd January 2017. I walked past it on Clifton Road. From here is the entrance to the Clifton Road Youth Centre and the Clifton Road Outdoor Education Centre.

A close up look at the sign on Clifton Road. Wyndley Leisure Centre is also in the park. The customer car park was about 400 metres from here.

This sign mentions that Authorised parking for Clifton Road Youth Centre only.

Passing a bus stop on Clifton Road, there was leaves on the ground below the trees.

A pair of signs on Clifton Road. To the left is the Sutton Park Town Gate. While Sutton Town Centre was to the right of here. I was heading towards Sutton Coldfield Town Hall at the time, so did not go into the park. The Town Gate can be accessed from Park Road. The Town Hall was a short walk away up Upper Clifton Road (and the Town Hall was the priority at the time to find).

June 2017

Flying back from a holiday in Lyon, France, back to Birmingham Airport, I could see Sutton Park from the plane window as we came into land. This is probably the best way to see the park from above.

This was the first view from the plane of Sutton Park. You can see a couple of the pools from up here and the Sutton Park railway line that goes through the park. Blackroot Pool on the left and the Bracebridge Pool seen to the right.

The view of Sutton Park at the bottom, with Sutton Coldfield to the top. It's possible that the parkland in this photo below is of the New Hall Valley Country Park near Walmley, towards Minworth. The plane would have been circling.

A decent view of Sutton Park from the Flybe plane we were in as we were coming into land. You can just about see the jet near the wing on the left side of the plane. You can see how big it is from up here. The plane would have been circling on the way down to the runway.

August 2017

Starting at Clifton Road, I headed towards Wyndley Lane past the Wyndley Swimming Baths.

Behind the fences was the Royal Sutton Coldfield Athletics Club.

I'm not sure what was happening at the Royal Sutton Coldfield Athletics Club site at the time, but it was obviously unsafe, or having construction work done.

First view of the Wyndley Pool. There was some geese and swans in the water.

Panoramic of the Wyndley Pool. It's the oldest pool in the park, possibly dating back to the 12th century.

About three swans in the Wyndley Pool near some ducks.

Heading on, now on Monmouth Drive on the long walk to the Boldmere Gate.

Some long grass between the trees from Monmouth Drive,

Re-entering the park at the Boldmere Gate. It is on Stonehouse Road.

View of the Sutton Coldfield Sea Cadets from Stonehouse Road, which is near the Boldmere Gate. A cadet training ship (on dry land).

The Miller & Carter Sutton Park restaurant / steakhouse is near Powell's Pool from this car park. Also called The Lakeside Restaurant. It is close to Powell's Pool.

The Boldmere Lodge. Also known as the Boldmere Gate Cottage. Dating to 1901.

Boldmere Lodge was completed in 1901, just inside the Park gate. Powells Pool and the fields behind the lodge were still privately owned, and were not incorporated into the Park until 1937. Stonehouse Mill had been demolished and the area landscaped in 1936, giving the area its present appearance. The Park gate was later moved to a more convenient position a few yards further in to the Park.

Mural by Fauna Graphic. The building has barbed wire on the roof.

From Stonehouse Road (just up from the Boldmere Gate), you can see Powell's Pool. Which is near a Miller & Carter. The pool dates to the 18th century.

Stepped weir on Powell's Pool with Canada geese at the far end.

Yachts at the far side of Powell's Pool. Is the Sutton Sailing Club.

Views of some yachts on Powell's Pool. Xenon 5.

This one with a pink sail and a boy with a yellow helmet on.

After my long walk to get into Sutton Park via the Boldmere Gate, I eventually found The Big Sleuth bear called Mother Bear. By the artist Jenny Tang, the sponsor was Seesaws.

View of Mother Bear from the back. Images of polar bears.

Next to Mother Bear was this selfie frame that you could big up and share you photos with Seesaws Nursery.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Now at 1,100 followers. Thank you.

Birmingham We Are People with Passion award winner 2020

Share  Connect with us
60 passion points
Construction & regeneration
16 Apr 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

The Cube from the last year of construction in 2009 till it was completed in 2010

I only started taking photos around Birmingham in 2009, so didn't get my first close up photos of The Cube until the summer of 2009. On and off I got the odd photo update. Then in 2010 when it was getting close to completion I took more photos of it. The Lovely People statues were installed by the end of 2010. This year The Cube is getting close to it's 10th anniversary.

Related View community

The Cube from the last year of construction in 2009 till it was completed in 2010





I only started taking photos around Birmingham in 2009, so didn't get my first close up photos of The Cube until the summer of 2009. On and off I got the odd photo update. Then in 2010 when it was getting close to completion I took more photos of it. The Lovely People statues were installed by the end of 2010. This year The Cube is getting close to it's 10th anniversary.


The Cube

The Cube was built between 2007 and 2010. The architect was Ken Shuttleworth of Make Architects. It should have been completed by 2008 but got delayed until 2010. Located near The Mailbox alongside the Worcester & Birmingham Canal on Commercial Street and near Washington Wharf.

 

2009

Indirect views of the construction of The Cube taken during April 2009 from Gas Street Basin. These are crops of the original photos. So you have the bridge near the Tap & Spile.

The narrowboats at Worcester Bar, and the buildings behind were derelict.

Views from June 2009. From the Worcester & Birmingham Canal towards the Salvage Turn Bridge.

Towards The Mailbox.

From The Mailbox.

The view from Brindleyplace along Oozells Street from Oozells Square (beyond Broad Street and down Berkley Street).

In October 2009 from Digbeth, The Cube on the Skyline behind The Sentinels, and to the left of the Beetham Tower and Centre City Tower. The Custard Factory (Devonshire House) is to the right.

December 2009 at The Mailbox (I was there for a work Christmas Party). Nightshots. Cladding of The Cube almost done apart from the Crown.

Views of The Cube down Bridge Street. Cladding on the side facing Premier Inn was not quite done.

Buildings on the left on the Arena Central site would not be demolished until 2015. Was an old hospital (I think).

2010

Heading to February 2010, this view was between Baskerville House and the site of the Library of Birmingham. Cladding around The Cube looked done, but the Crown still hadn't had glass panels installed. The old Municipal Bank below.

From Cambridge Street past the Library of Birmingham site. This end of The REP was going to be demolished before the library was built. Could see The Cube to the left. If you stand here today, you will not be able to See The Cube (unless you go up to the Discovery Terrace or Secret Garden).

A few more views of The Cube from Bridge Street with a Victorian style lamppost. Looks like a gas lit one (but probably has light bulbs).

May 2010 and they had finally put up the glass panels on the Crown of The Cube. Views from The Mailbox.

The Highways Agency would become one of the first tenants at The Cube.

This view over the future Arena Central site behind Centenary Plaza. This was a view from Centenary Square near the Hall of Memory.

June 2010 and my first views of The Cube now more or less complete from Highgate Park and on the skyline with The Sentinels and Beetham Tower.

Views from Bristol Street. Buildings that were on Holloway Head. So not far from Holloway Circus.

July 2010 and some more views of The Cube from The Mailbox.

The Cube from Gas Street Basin, now complete.

December 2010 and my first interior photos of The Cube. Mainly to see the Lovely People statues.

The Lovely People by Temper.

Urban

Positioned as though welcoming guests to The Cube, ‘Urban’ represents the difficulties of facing of adversity, as well as the triumphs of overcoming these to create a better life.
Inspiration: Lee Fortnam, who faced troubles throughout his early life, but with the help of The Prince’s Trust went on to begin a successful career as a Corgi registered gas and plumbing engineer – later becoming an ambassador for the charity.

Mother & Child

The only pair of figures within the collection, ‘Mother and Child’ can be found on Level 7, sharing the unparalleled bond between a mother and her children.
Inspiration: Ellie-Mae, who was born in with a hole in her heart, and Rachel, who had no choice but to leave her daughter in the capable hands of the staff at Birmingham Children’s Hospital.

Uplifted

Suspended high within the atrium, ‘Uplifted’ tells the story of bravery and self-sacrifice of those who help people in need. The sculpture was designed to show a person holding on to the balloon preparing for life’s ride.
Inspiration: Firefighter Dave Burns of the West Midlands Fire Service who, in 1992, entered a 20-storey building to rescue two colleagues from a floor engulfed in flames. Burns was later awarded the George Medal by Queen Elizabeth II.

Working Man

Found on Level 5, ‘The Working Man’ is sat on a bench reading a newspaper, representative of people who work to provide for their family and put a roof over their head.
Inspiration: Birmingham-born Barry O’Neil who turned the notion of ‘nine-to-five’ into something much more heroic. Having worked for some of the West Midlands greatest manufacturers, including JCB and MG Rover, O’Neil proved there is no pursuit more honest or dignified.

Persuit

Tucked within the office spaces on Level 8 you’ll find ‘Pursuit’, representing Birmingham’s entrepreneurial heritage and the legacy it holds to this day.
Inspiration: Paul Bassi, businessman and first Asian president of the Chamber of Commerce, recognised for his contribution to business and the economy, as well as his selflessness.

Survivor

An addition to Level 6, ‘Survivor’ reflects the perseverance and bravery of people when faced with times of crisis.
Inspiration: Holocaust survivor, Gerda Cavangh, who escaped Vienna, trekked across Europe and arrived in England as a stowaway. Born into a Jewish family in Austria, Cavangh’s mother encouraged her to flee the country. Once in England, she worked as a medical orderly in the Auxiliary Territorial Services, receiving two service medals for her work.

I've taken more views of The Cube since then from 2011 until earlier in 2020 on and off, but will leave those photos for another post maybe.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Now at 1,110 followers. Thank you.

Birmingham We Are People with Passion award winner 2020

Share  Connect with us
60 passion points
Green open spaces
16 Apr 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

Victoria Park in Smethwick

I popped into Victoria Park in Smethwick back in November 2018. There I found a war memorial and a sculpture on the outside wall. There was also another sculpture within the park in memory of the victims of the Birmingham Riots in 2011. It was unveiled in 2012. The park also has outdoor gym equipment and a bandstand. The park is close to the Smethwick Council House.

Related View community

Victoria Park in Smethwick





I popped into Victoria Park in Smethwick back in November 2018. There I found a war memorial and a sculpture on the outside wall. There was also another sculpture within the park in memory of the victims of the Birmingham Riots in 2011. It was unveiled in 2012. The park also has outdoor gym equipment and a bandstand. The park is close to the Smethwick Council House.


We start our look around one of the many parks around the Black Country that I've popped into over the years. In November 2018 I got a bus to Smethwick to check out the new Lions of the Great War statue, then I walked down the Smethwick High Street towards the Smethwick Council House before I found Victoria Park.

 

The Smethwick Heritage Centre Trust is to the right of the main entrance to the park. On the day of my visit it was closed. Normally it would be open on Thursday's, Friday's and Saturday's (during the lockdown period we are in I expect it is closed every day now). It is located in a former Park-Keepers Lodge.

The entrance to the museum would be round the back. They had collected over 20 years of artefacts, memorabilia and photographs connected to Smethwick's proud and distinct heritage. Their most popular material is their content relating to WW1 and WW2.

On the wall outside of the park near the Heritage Centre is this culpture called Birmid. There were some sections to the left and right that have gone missing. I don't know who the artist was.

Between the Smethwick Council House and the Heritage Centre is the War Memorial.

It is Grade II listed dating to 1920 made of granite and bronze.

The poppy wreaths were probably laid a few days before on Remembrance Sunday.

Many of these parks have these Lest We Forget soldier statues installed near the War Memorial.

There was also these poppies and crosses nearby as well.

Heading into the park saw this sign and notice board. Welcome to Victoria Park Smethwick.

Saw this bandstand in the distance.

This is the British Olympic heroes mural. It looks like an outdoor gym was behind.

Heading along a path further into the park saw this outdoor gym equipment. Bit like an outdoor treadmill.

This is the Birmingham Riots Memorial. Created by Infamous Arts.

The memorial was commissioned to commemorate the tragic deaths of Haroon Jahan, Shahzad Ali, and Abdul Musavir who were killed during the Birmingham Riots of 2011. The memorial was designed in conjunction with local primary schools who also assisted in the creation of tiles used within the mosaic work. It consists of three lamp posts, dedicated to each of the young men, along with a remembrance bench and dedication spiral on the floor. The memorial was unveiled in Smethwick’s Victoria Park on the 28th of September 2012.

Saw another sculpture, some kind of metal rock. Not sure what it is supposed to represent or who it was by.

Another outdoor gym equipment. Looks like a rowing machine.

Near the end of the path, close to Tiverton Road. I did not know that there was a pond in the park when I left (I can see it now on the Google Maps satellite view).

Another Welcome to Victoria Park Smethwick sign. Near the Tiverton Road exit / entrance.

Looking on the map, there is another entrance on Victoria Park Road. At the time I think I went back to a bus stop on the Smethwick High Street and caught a bus to Dudley.

 

The other park in Smethwick, is West Smethwick Park. I only went there once in June 2012 to see the James T. Chance sculpture and the memorial to John Homer Chance (so a post of that park will be quite small and I never went back). Looks like that has a Boating Lake. The main reason at the time for going to West Smethwick was to find the Malcolm X plaque on Marshall Street.

There is at least two other parks in Smethwick that I've never been to: Smethwick Hall Park and Harry Mitchell Park.

I've been to Langley Green once, but was not aware of the nearby parks: Barnford Hall Park and Langley Park.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Now at 1,110 followers. Thank you.

Birmingham We Are People with Passion award winner 2020

Share  Connect with us
60 passion points

Top Contributors

Daniel Sturley
WestMidlandsWeAre points: 20K
Combined FreeTimePays points: 48K
Elliott Brown
WestMidlandsWeAre points: 17K
Combined FreeTimePays points: 54K
FreeTimePays
WestMidlandsWeAre points: 8421
Combined FreeTimePays points: 21K
Karl Newton
WestMidlandsWeAre points: 1390
Combined FreeTimePays points: 2910
Stephen Giles
WestMidlandsWeAre points: 1020
Combined FreeTimePays points: 12K

Show more