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Classic Architecture
11 May 2020 - Elliott Brown
Did you know?

A tour of Soho House in the summer of 2010

Did you know that before the Birmingham Museums Trust took over from Birmingham City Council, you had to sign a disclaimer when you wanted to take photos around Soho House? My only visit to Soho House was in July 2010. It was the home of Matthew Boulton from 1766 until his death in 1809, so went the year after his bicentenary of his death. The Lunar Society met here in the late 18th C.

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A tour of Soho House in the summer of 2010





Did you know that before the Birmingham Museums Trust took over from Birmingham City Council, you had to sign a disclaimer when you wanted to take photos around Soho House? My only visit to Soho House was in July 2010. It was the home of Matthew Boulton from 1766 until his death in 1809, so went the year after his bicentenary of his death. The Lunar Society met here in the late 18th C.


Soho House

The Birmingham Museums Trust took over from the running of the museum at Soho House which was previously run by Birmingham City Council until 2012. At the time of my visit, I had to sign a form to get permission to take photos inside of the house (which I've not had to do since at other venues). The visit was during July 2010.

Some history.

The house located in Handsworth, was built for Matthew Boulton one of the 18th century's major entrepeneurs. Who ran the Soho Manufactory (taking over Soho Mill in 1761). Originally a cottage was on this site which he had expanded, making several changes. Boulton moved in during 1766 and he became one of the founding members of the Lunar Society. He hired Samuel Wyatt in 1789 to landscape the garden and extend the buildings. In 1796 his brother James Wyatt, made additions to the main front. It is now a Grade II* listed building.

When Matthew Boulton died in 1809, the house passed to his son, Matthew Robinson Boulton and later grandson Matthew Piers Watt Boulton who later sold the property in 1850. Over the years the house had a variety of owners. At one point it was a residential hostel for police officers. Birmingham City Council acquired the house in 1990 and opened it as a museum in 1995. In 2012 the Birmingham Museums Trust took over from the Council for running Soho House.

A map of the Soho area which was taken from Matthew Boulton's Notebook no. 27 dating to 1793 to 1799.

This view of the Soho Manufactory was taken from J. Bissett's Magnificent Directory, dating to 1800.

Below is a watercolour of Soho House painted by Paul Braddon.

The above images were taken from a guide book called "Matthew Boulton Bicentenary Celebrations", published by Birmingham City Council in 2009 (when Matthew Boulton has been dead for 200 years).

 

Plan of Soho, this map from when Matthew Robinon Boulton owned the estate from 1809 (death of his father) until 1842 (his own death). Including the Soho Manufactory. Soho House is to the right. Below used to be Soho Pool.

The above Public Domain Dedication image taken from the Birmingham Museums Trust Digital Image Resource. Which are Public Domain images free to download.

 

You can find my full Flickr album on Soho House here: Soho House, Handsworth.

Arriving at Soho House for the July 2010 visit.

There is a blue plaque on the wall for Matthew Boulton from the Birmingham Civic Society, stating that he lived here from 1766 to 1809.

This photo came out a bit blurry, despite some attempts to edit it. Also the man that worked here for the Council came out and sat on the bench. I think I had to sign the form for him.

View from the back of the garden. These garden views were taken after the look around the house.

Same photo as above but a different crop. There is a tea room on the right.

Now for a look around the rooms inside of Soho House.

Breakfast Room

This room would probably have been used by the Boulton family as an informal sitting room as well as a breakfast room. The marble chimney-piece is one of a number that survive throughout the house and dates from the late 1790s.

Drawing Room

The Drawing Room was one of the principal rooms in the house and would generally have been used only for entertaining guests or on other special occasions. Matthew Boulton purchased the japanned chairs for this room in 1798 from the cabinet maker James Newton.

To the left there was a bust of Matthew Boulton.

And to the right was a bust of James Watt.

Dining Room

The Dining Room of Soho House has come to be known as the Lunar Room, named after the Lunar Society who often met here. This eminent group of scientists and manufacturers met at Boulton's home to dine together, and to exchange ideas, discuss their inventions or entertain each other with scientific experiments.

The mirror and fireplace in the Dining Room aka the Lunar Room.

Entrance Hall

This portrait of Matthew Boulton was in the entrance hall.

Matthew Boulton's Study

Matthew Boulton filled his home with scientific instruments, equipment and books. to the left of the fireplace is a diagonal barometer by John Whitehurst of Derby, c. 1775. Above the chimneypiece is a pastel drawing "The Face of the Moon" by John Russell, c. 1795.

Fossilry

This room contains Matthew Boulton's large collection of geological specimens. In 1782 he created a "fossilry at his Manufactory to house his collection, and by 1803 it has been moved to this room, so that he could keep and study his specimens in his house. The mahogany cabinet contains drawers for storing geological specimens and is one of a pair formerly owned by Matthew Boulton.

Housekeeper's Room

This room was the kitchen of the house where the housekeeper would cook for the Boulton family.

They would prepare food on this table.

They would also do other tasks such as cleaning the house and the chimney.

Wine Cellar

Under the house was the extensive cellars at Soho House. They were used for the storage of wine, beer, ale, oil lamps, and some foodstuffs. This area was the wine cellar and still has it's original slate shelving.

This is also near the area used for the Furnace & Heating System. This cardboard cut out of a man showing the kind of tasks that were done down here. I'm not sure if he was carrying a bag of coal or disposing of the household waste?

The stairs from the different levels of the house. We were heading back up into the house.

Ladies Room

At the time I wasn't able to make out what this room was called or used for. There was a chair for a lady to sit on, and a dress on display. The chair was called a Day Bed and was made in 1805, probably for Miss Boulton (Matthew's daughter).

Miss Boulton's Sitting Room

This room was used by Matthew Boulton's daughter, Anne as a small sitting room. Anne Boulton who was born in 1768, spent most of her life at Soho House. She never married, and only moved to a house of her own in 1818 after her brother's marriage, when Soho House became his family home.

A portrait of Ann Boulton in the Sitting Room.

Matthew Boulton's Bedroom

This room became Matthew Boulton's bedroom c 1803, before this it was his library. The house was remodelled in the late 18th century and the handsome marble chimneypiece was probably put in as part of this work. The mahogany bed dates from the 18th century.

There was a portrait of Matthew Boulton in his bedroom. By Carl Frederick von Breda. There is a similar one at the Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery (or it is the same one in their collection).

Miss Boulton's Bedroom

This room is displayed as Miss Boulton's Bedroom, although c 1800 she probably had a bedroom across the passage. By the 1780s, fashionable homes had begun to have highly co-ordinated interiors. There is a mahogany side table and japanned chairs, all by James Newton.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Now at more than 1,130 followers. Thank you.

Birmingham We Are People with Passion award winner 2020

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80 passion points
Photography
11 May 2020 - Mac McCreery
Gallery

Modern Times

I hope that you are all okay.

I live in Digbeth and am thus lucky to be sat on top of the city.

My camera goes with me on my daily walks and I have just captured scenes as they present themselves.

These are just a handful.

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Modern Times





I hope that you are all okay.

I live in Digbeth and am thus lucky to be sat on top of the city.

My camera goes with me on my daily walks and I have just captured scenes as they present themselves.

These are just a handful.


 

 

 

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40 passion points
Modern Architecture
11 May 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

The Cube from 2011 to The Big Hoot 2015

A gallery of photos I've taken of The Cube from early 2011 until 2015 when The Big Hoot owl sculpture trail was on. Over the years I have taken many views of The Cube from the City Centre. Either from the canals or from the nearby streets. Many different views of it to see. The only time I got the lift all the way up to the top was in the summer of 2015 to see The Big Hoot owl up there

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The Cube from 2011 to The Big Hoot 2015





A gallery of photos I've taken of The Cube from early 2011 until 2015 when The Big Hoot owl sculpture trail was on. Over the years I have taken many views of The Cube from the City Centre. Either from the canals or from the nearby streets. Many different views of it to see. The only time I got the lift all the way up to the top was in the summer of 2015 to see The Big Hoot owl up there


I've taken many views of The Cube over the years. This is a gallery of photos I've taken between 2011 and 2015. Most of them taken in 2011 and 2012. By 2013 the Library of Birmingham had opened, so some new views. By 2015 I went into The Cube to see the pair of Big Hoot owls, which you will see further down this post.

2011

These views of The Cube were taken during January 2011.

View from Upper Gough Street, looking down Upper Marshall Street.

The view below was from Washington Street.

Better view from the end of Washington Street, close to Commercial Street.

Close up from Wasington Street before going onto Commercial Street.

The rear entrance on Commercial Street. Was a website at the time called The Cube is Coming. Promising Amazing Views.

Looking up from Commercial Street towards the Crown.

Commercial Street from ground level.

Slightly further back on Commercial Street with the building to the left.

The Cube dominating every other building on Commercial Street.

There is also a view from the Worcester & Birmingham Canal between Granville Street and the Salvage Turn Bridge. This would have been from the Granville Street Bridge towards The Mailbox.

2012

Now for some views taken during February 2012.

This view of The Cube was taken from Granville Street near Washington Wharf. There is an old building surviving amongst all the modern ones here.

Views of The Cube taken from the Worcester & Birmingham Canal between Bath Row and Granville Street, February 2012.

In front of The Cube on the canalside is The Maltings, also called Davenports House, they are student accommodation for University College Birmingham (UCB).

You can get onto the canal from the steps at Bath Row near Bishopsgate Street. If you want to, get off the canal at the steps at Granville Street.

In fact I did get off the canal at Granville Street. One last view of The Cube from down here.

2013

Views of The Cube taken in May 2013.

This view below from Brindleyplace, while I was on Oozells Street. Looking down Berkley Street.

Another view from Oozells Street looking down Berkley Street below. Concrete one one of the nightclubs on Broad Street. The Rocket Club.

Detailed zoom in from Berkley Street towards the criss crosses patterns. A bit like TETRIS (and this was before Holiday Inn Express was built on Holliday Street).

Corner of the Crown zoomed up from Berkley Street.

In July 2013 there was a Mini below The Cube from the canalside. Was something about My First Mini.

In August 2013 I saw this Diving Sculpture from Waterfront Walk near the canalside towpath of the Worcester & Birmingham Canal opposite The Cube.

The artist was Cathy Lewis and she was commissioned to make it in 2006 by Charles Church Developments to create a large sculpture for a public site beside the new Register Office at Holliday Wharf, Birmingham. At the time a narrowboat name Eloiuse was moored up on the canal.

Slightly further back view of Cathy Lewis's Diving Sculpture from Waterfront Walk.

In the middle of September 2013 on a photo walk around Highgate, I spotted this view of The Cube from Angelina Street.

In September 2013, the then new Library of Birmingham opened to the public for the first time, and while there got some views of The Cube from there. This view was from Level 2, at the time known as the Knowledge floor.

View of The Cube from the Discovery Terrace at the Library of Birmingham which was on Level 3, known at the time as the Discovery floor.

Another view from the Discovery Terrace, with some of circular structure of the Library of Birmingham above.

In this December 2013 view below taken from Tyseley Station. The zoom on my then bridge camera probably went beyond into digital zoom which gets a bit pixelly. The area above the Tyseley DMU Depot. At the time I got a train from my local station, got off at Tyseley, then waited for another train on the line to Solihull.

2014

Not so many views taken of The Cube in 2014. In October 2014 I was looking for a blue plaque on Tindal Street in Balsall Heath when I spotted this view of The Cube. The Hyatt Hotel is just about visible from here to the right.

2015

From Centenary Square during January 2015. Winter Skate Birmingham (late Ice Skate Birmingham) was being dismantled after the end of the Christmas / Winter season. Saw this view of The Cube looking down Bridge Street. At the time the former Register Office (later House of Sport) had yet to be demolished for Arena Central. The Hyatt Hotel seen to the right. There was a JCB in Centenary Square,

The July 2015 visit to The Cube was to see the pair of Big Hoot owls that they had in the building.

A few floors down from the ground floor was Mr Architect by the artist Sam Pierpoint and the sponsor was The Cube. On this side the design had The Cube as the hair, Library of Birmingham as the wings, The Mailbox was on the legs and Selfridges as the feet.

The design had The Cube as the hair, Curzon Street Station at the back of the head, and the Library of Birmingham as the body and Selfridges as the feet.

This sign on the ground floor welcomed you to The Cube. Mr Architect was reachable via the lift or escalators to Level 5. For Owl-livia, you had to take the lift up to Level 25 to the Hotel Indigo Reception area.

After catching the lift up to Level 25 it was time to look at the next owl. Owl-livia was by the artist Charlie Langhorne and the sponsor was Marco Pierre White Steakhouse Bar and Grill Birmingham.

While at the top near Hotel Indigo and Marco Pierre White, I took an opportunity to get photos of the views from the top.

This view from the top of The Cube towards Jurys Inn and other buildings along Broad Street. It has changed a lot since then (I've not had a need to go back up to the top of The Cube since).

I may next cover The Cube from 2016 to 2020, but might be less photos.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

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40 passion points
Classic Architecture
07 May 2020 - Elliott Brown
Inspiration

A look around Aston Hall during the Heritage Open Day in September 2017

During the September 2017 Birmingham Heritage Week event the Civil War Siege 1643, I had a chance to have a look around all the rooms at Aston Hall, while it was not too busy. Come with me as we look around these rooms dating back to the 17th century while we are in self isolation. Some interiors may date the 18th century. From Sir Thomas Holte to James Watt Jr.

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A look around Aston Hall during the Heritage Open Day in September 2017





During the September 2017 Birmingham Heritage Week event the Civil War Siege 1643, I had a chance to have a look around all the rooms at Aston Hall, while it was not too busy. Come with me as we look around these rooms dating back to the 17th century while we are in self isolation. Some interiors may date the 18th century. From Sir Thomas Holte to James Watt Jr.


My visit to Aston Hall was on the 16th September 2017.

For my previous Aston Hall or Aston Park posts check out my previous posts here:

Quick history recap: Aston Hall was built between 1618 and 1635 by John Thorpe for Sir Thomas Holte, who moved into the hall in 1631 (before it was complete). The house was damaged by Parliamentary troops during the Civil War in 1643 (it still has visible scars). The house was sold and leased to James Watt Jr. in 1817. It became a museum after 1858. The Birmingham Corporation bought the house in 1864. Now run by the Birmingham Museums Trust, who took over from Birmingham City Council in 2012.

Aston Hall The East Front painted in 1854 by John Joseph Hughes. Public Domain.

Isometric View of Aston Hall, painted in 1860 by Allen Edward Everitt. Public Domain.

Public Domain Dedication images above from the collection of the Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery. Which are free to download from this link.

View below of Aston Hall in September 2017 before the Civil War Siege 1643 event began.

Rear view of Aston Hall from the back in Aston Park. Pan sculpture in the middle.

Now for a tour around Aston Hall.

The Great Hall

Seen during the Civil War Siege re-enactment. The actor on the left was playing Sir Thomas Holte. The portrait of the real Sir Thomas Holte was on the wall in the middle.

The portrait of Sir Thomas Holte in the Great Hall.

Great Drawing Room

Bit like a lounge with chairs around a fireplace, and somewhere to have tea. Furnished in the 18th century style for James Watt Jr.

The Green Library

A desk in the middle of the room with old books all around. Probably where James Watt Jr sat to work in the 19th century.

Small Dining Room

Furnished in the 18th century style. Called the Dining Parlour in 1771, this room remained a family breakfast and dining room until 1848. The 18th century fireplace was installed in 1960.

Portrait of James Watt (1736 - 1819) in the Small Dining Room. He was the famous father of James Watt Jr. 

The Johnson Room

In the 1760s this was a dressing room also used by Sir Lister Holte as an estate office. In 1817 it was known as the Little Blue Room and in James Watt's time it was the Study or Yellow Library.

In 1882 it was lined with panelling taken from a house in Old Square which belonged to Dr Hector, a friend of Samuel Johnson, hence it's modern name. It now contains displays on the Hall's history as a public museum.

There was a stuffed tiger in this room.

The Great Parlour

When Aston Hall was built this was the family's principal living room. Around 1700 it was converted into a chapel. The room's Jacobean panelling survives and it is furnished with oak furniture from the same period.

The Orange Chamber

Bedroom on the first floor. More in the 17th century style up here. These rooms were in the West Range.

King Charles Room

Known as the Best Lodging Chamber in 1654, this was one of the rooms used by King Charles I when he spent the night of the 18th October 1642 at Aston, shortly before the Battle of Edgehill.

Featuring artefacts from the English Civil War period. Civil War armour and an open cabinet.

Great Dining Room

In this room King Charles I dined here in 1642, on his way to Kenilworth during the English Civil War. (you can see the table from both sides).

Withdrawing Room

A small room with a table and chairs, with an old tapestry to the back of the room.

Long Gallery

The most impressive room at Aston Hall! I was lucky enough to get the whole room to myself at one point. Amazing that this has survived the centuries.

The World Room

An exhibition gallery of small objects in this room. In the 1650s this room was the Chamber over the Scullery, the anteroom to Sir Thomas Holte's bedchamber. After 1700 it became Sir Lister Holte's library. Heneage Legge  (who came to live at Aston Hall in 1794) turned it into his new bedroom and inserted large sash windows. The room now contains displays which explore the global influences on fashionable living and the design and decoration of furniture and furnishings during the 17th and 18th centuries.

The Passage Room

This is the corridor between the rooms on the first floor.

Dressing Room

This was originally part of Sir Thomas Holte's bedchamber, this room was formed in about 1700. It was transformed by Sir Lister Holte in the 1750s who installed the fine fireplace. By 1771 it had become the Dressing Room to the Best Chamber. After 1794 it became the Dressing Room to Heneage Legge's Blue Room next door. By 1819 it was known as the Chinese Room.

Best Bedchamber

This room is not mentioned in the 1654 inventories, but it may have been Lady Holte's chamber. Around 1700 it was panelled and extended to the north, creating a large recess for a bed. It replaced the Chamber over the Kitchen as the principal family bedroom and was occupied by Sir Lister Holte and later by his widow, Sarah Newton. It is now furnished with pieces that would have decorated the bedchamber of a wealthy Georgian lady such as Lady Holte.

Oak Staircase

Up to Dick's Garret or down to exit. You can head up to the attic where the servants lived.

Dick's Garret

Replica 17th century servant's bed. Up here was where the servant's of Aston Hall slept for the night. Probably as it was during the 18th century.

Servants Hall

Probably the kitchen where the servants prepared food for the Holte family. The following rooms are in the basement of Aston Hall.

The Pantry

This room was formed during the alterations to the kitchen around 1700. In 1771 it was the Butler's Room, where he kept the silver and his trays. After 1819 it was used by James Watt's footmen who cleaned the oil lamps here.

Kitchen

Servants seen preparing food in the kitchen during the Civil War Siege 1643 event (actors during the Birmingham Heritage Week re-enactment). It looks like there was breads and pastries on the tables. As well as butter and eggs. And a boars head!

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Now at more than 1,130 followers. Thank you.

Birmingham We Are People with Passion award winner 2020

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50 passion points
Green open spaces
06 May 2020 - Elliott Brown
Did you know?

Memorials in Cannon Hill Park

There is at least three memorials now in Cannon Hill Park. Including the Boer War Memorial, also the Boy Scouts War Memorial (of 1924) near the Nature Centre. And more recently the memorial to the Sousse and Bardo Terrorist Attacks (which happened in 2015). This was unveiled by Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex in March 2019.

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Memorials in Cannon Hill Park





There is at least three memorials now in Cannon Hill Park. Including the Boer War Memorial, also the Boy Scouts War Memorial (of 1924) near the Nature Centre. And more recently the memorial to the Sousse and Bardo Terrorist Attacks (which happened in 2015). This was unveiled by Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex in March 2019.


Did you know that Cannon Hill Park has three memorials within the park?

The oldest of the three was the Boer War Memorial, which is now Grade II* listed. It was sculpted by Albert Toft. It was installed in 1906. The Boer War was fought in South Africa from 1899-1902 (Joseph Chamberlain was the Minister at the time that this war broke out).

The second oldest is the Boy Scouts War Memorial, on Queens Drive, on the footpath towards the Birmingham Nature Centre. It is Grade II listed and dates to 1924 in memory of local Boy Scouts who lost their lives in the First World War. The sculptor was William Haywood. It was later modified to remember those lives lost during the Second World War.

The most recent memorial sculpture is called Infinite Wave and was unveiled in March 2019 by HRH the Duke of Sussex (Prince Harry) in memory of the victims of the 2015 Sousse and Bardo Terrorist Attacks. It was designed by George King Architects.

 

Boer War Memorial

The Second Boer War was fought between 1899 and 1902 between the British Empire and two independent Boer states over the Empire's influence in South Africa. At the time Birmingham's own Joseph Chamberlain was the British Colonial Secretary. The Boer War Memorial was proposed to be in either Old Square or on Corporation Street in the City Centre but this was rejected in favour of Cannon Hill Park. This decision was taken in 1904. The memorial was designed by Albert Toft and unveiled in 1906. It was cleaned and repaired in 2012. It is now Grade II* listed.

The following photos below were taken in May 2009 on my then mobile phone camera, so the bronze was looking quite green at the time.

There was a cannon at the front.

Names of the soldiers around the sides.

And at the back of the plinth.

This side has a bronze plaque inscribed "TO  THE GLORIOUS MEMORY OF THE  SONS OF BIRMINGHAM  WHO FELL IN THE SOUTH AFRICAN WAR 1899-1902  AND TO PERPETUATE  THE EXAMPLE OF ALL WHO  SERVED IN THE WAR THIS MEMORIAL IS ERECTED BY THEIR FELLOW CITIZENS" .

By November 2009, I took my first bridge camera for a photo session around Cannon Hill Park, and that meant getting new photos of the Boer War Memorial (to try and improve on the mobile shots from the previous Spring). This was the approach from the back.

A close up of the statue. There is a large figure of a woman in the middle. Then a pair of male soldiers either side of a cannon.

Further back towards the Boer War Memorial. The flower beds didn't have much in them at this point.

The statue was surrounded by all these benches and bins. People who sit here, probably don't even realise what this memorial is for or represents. As not many people know about the Boer War (compared to WW1 and WW2).

The first of three plaques with the names of fallen Birmingham soldiers from the Boer War (1899-1902).

The second names plaque.

And the third names plaque.

I have been back to Cannon Hill Park many times over the years since, but not got new photos of the Boer War Memorial, even after it was restored (wasn't thinking about it).

Boy Scouts War Memorial

Queen's Ride is the road / path near Cannon Hill Park, and part of it is now the public car park of the park. Beyond the bollards is this war memorial on the walk towards the entrance of what was the Birmingham Nature Centre (now Birmingham Wildlife Conservation Centre). The Boy Scouts War Memorial has been Grade II listed since 2016. It was unveiled on the 27th July 1924 in memory of the local Boy Scouts who lost their lives during the First World War. The obelisk was designed by local Birmingham architect William Hayward (1877-1957). The memorial was conserved in 2012 by the Birmingham Museums Trust and Birmingham City Council.

The following photos were taken in December 2010 when there was a light dusting of snow on the ground.

Close up of the Boy Scouts War Memorial. Behind you can see the bollards on the Queen's Ride (car park behind). Queen's Ride was laid out in 1897 as a riding track, and later modified in 1920 when an avenue of trees was planted to commemorate the fallen Scouts.

This view of the Boy Scouts War Memorial towards the trees that line the path towards the Pershore Road.

In the late Victorian period, it is possible that people rode their horses and carts down here, but these days it's most likely to be cyclists on their bikes. The only cars at this end (or vans) from the Council groundsmen who maintain the park. This way to the entrance of the Nature Centre.

Was a couple of poppy wreaths at the base of the obelisk. From the Scouts. I would assume they were laid in early November 2010.

I have walked this route the odd time over the years. In the summer there is always colourful flowers planted around the Boy Scouts War Memorial. This was in July 2013.

More of the same in August 2014, red flowers, pink flowers and white flowers all the way around the obelisk.

In July 2018 there was mostly red flowers around the obelisk. You can tell that the memorial had been restored / cleaned up compared to my earlier photos. You can even see a smiley face on this side!

Infinite Wave

Birmingham's Cannon Hill Park was chosen to be the location of the Sousee and Bardo Memorial. It is a monument to the 31 British Nationals who lost their lives in two terrorists attacks in Tunisia in 2015. The project was commissioned by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office. It was unveiled in March 2019 by Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex at a ceremony attended by over 300 guests. The architect was George King Architects.

I initially got photos of it in late February 2019, but was still barriers around it. I later came back for a proper look at it during late May 2019.

As you can see at the end of February 2019, Infinite Wave was almost complete but was barriers around it.

This was a few days before Prince Harry travelled to Birmingham to unveiled the memorial.

I couldn't get too close as the barriers were also near the main path in the park, but I would return near the end of the Spring for some updates.

I popped back to Cannon Hill Park near the end of May 2019 for a full look at the Sousse Memorial. Now known as Infinite Wave.

There is a path that leads up to the memorial sculpture.

Like with the other memorials in the park, there was this metal memorial plaque listing the naems of the victims of the Sousse and Bardo Terrorist Attacks.

Now time to walk around the wavey sculpture.

It meant going off the path and onto the grass.

It looks a bit like a spring, or one of those toys that you can push down the stairs, or between your hands.

It forms 31 individual streams, one for each victim who lost their lives in the attacks.

There is an area in the middle that visitors can stand in and admire the memorial.

Young children would probably run around in circles and have fun.

It pretty much looks the same on the other side.

I wonder if when the pandemic ends, if the Government would consider having a memorial here for those lost to the virus? What kind of memorial would you like to see in Cannon Hill Park for that?

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Now at over 1,130 followers. Thank you.

Birmingham We Are People with Passion award winner 2020

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