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Transport
02 Mar 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

Trams at the Black Country Living Museum (August 2011)

Some old tram photos of mine taken from a day out at the Black Country Living Museum during August 2011. Tram 34 and tram 49. We actually had a ride at the time on tram 49 on the top deck, which was in the open air. The museum is located in Dudley in the Black Country. The museum opened in 1975. I'm sure it's probably changed since my visit including Peaky Blinders filming.

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Trams at the Black Country Living Museum (August 2011)





Some old tram photos of mine taken from a day out at the Black Country Living Museum during August 2011. Tram 34 and tram 49. We actually had a ride at the time on tram 49 on the top deck, which was in the open air. The museum is located in Dudley in the Black Country. The museum opened in 1975. I'm sure it's probably changed since my visit including Peaky Blinders filming.


From a day out at the Black Country Living Museum, on the 14th August 2011. There was plenty to see on my first (and so far) only visit to this open air museum. So my visit precedes the filming of episodes of Peaky Blinders by a few years.

Tram 49

This is a Wolverhampton Corporation double decker tram, built in 1909. It is a typical Edwardian tramcar with a lower saloon and open upper deck. It was withdrawn in 1921. It was restored by the Black Country Living Museum and put into service in 2004.

 

I first saw tram 49 before we headed to have a look in the museum full of vintage cars and other vehicles. It was passing the war memorial. Which was passing these umbrella looking shields.

In this view the tram is seen heading to "Penn Fields" (well not really) and had an old Express and Star advert on the side.

Seen from the other direction getting close to the end of the journey. There was stairs at both ends, and they have to manually move the overhead pantograph, so that the tram can go in the other direction.

Again seen here, passengers are getting off the tram.

A lady seemed to reverse backwards down the steps.

Adverts also at the front and back. Here you see "Gray's Herbal Tablets".

The tram driver and the ticket inspector have a chat, or hand over the keys?

They only had two volunteers, we had to wait for the tram to get back before we could ride it. By then they had 3 volunteers and we went up to the top deck of the tram.

Seen here, visitors are seeing heading down the steps and getting off the tram. It was the stop close to the village, and wasn't too far from where tram 34 was. This was after my tram ride, so I took this photo after I got off.

A few hours later, saw tram 49 again. This time passing the Underground Mine. This side was an advert for the Co-op.

Tram 34

This tram was built in 1919 for operation on Wolverhampton District Tramways. It was an enclosed single decker tram that could accommodate 32 seated passengers. It was withdrawn in 1928.

 

Saw this model of tram 34 in the exhibitions rooms which were housed in the former Rolfe Street Baths building. It was the second exhibition in this room.

Now onto the real tram 34. We did not ride it, and I'm not sure if it was in use on the day of our visit. It's destination was Dudley.

It was positioned at the time next to the tram depot.

They have other trams in the collection at the Black Country Living Museum, Horse Drawn Tram 23 and Tram 5 although I didn't see them at the time (almost 9 years ago now). More details here: Tram Collection.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Now at 1,100 followers. Thank you.

Birmingham We Are People with Passion award winner 2020

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Transport
02 Mar 2020 - Elliott Brown
News & Updates

West Midlands Metro tram 24 has a new sponsor: Resorts World Birmingham

I unexpectedly saw a West Midlands Metro tram with purple Resorts World Birmingham adverts on Corporation Street in the morning. At lunchtime on Friday 28th February 2020, saw it again and it was tram 24. It is also for Birmingham International Station and probably The NEC Birmingham. Seen heading between Corporation Street and Bull Street tram stops. Seen passing Martineau Place.

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West Midlands Metro tram 24 has a new sponsor: Resorts World Birmingham





I unexpectedly saw a West Midlands Metro tram with purple Resorts World Birmingham adverts on Corporation Street in the morning. At lunchtime on Friday 28th February 2020, saw it again and it was tram 24. It is also for Birmingham International Station and probably The NEC Birmingham. Seen heading between Corporation Street and Bull Street tram stops. Seen passing Martineau Place.


West Midlands Metro Tram 24 from OLA to Resorts World

Seen at Library Tram Stop on Saturday 18th January 2020, was West Midlands Metro tram 24.

At the time that tram 24 was departing, they were still dismantling Ice Skate Birmingham on the Reflective Pool (the water jets are now back on). See my latest Centenary Square post here Centenary Square lit up after dark with the Water Jet fountains.

Seen at Grand Central Tram Stop on Friday 21st February 2020 was West Midlands Metro trams 24 and 27. Both with OLA adverts, I think the first time I got both in one photo. At the time the batteries on tram 24 was still externally white.

On Friday 28th February 2020, seen in the rain on Corporation Street, tram 24 again, but this time in brand new Resorts World purple adverts. Also featuring Birmingham International Station. Possibly also The NEC. I let the tram pass me before I took this photo in the rain. Going past Martineau Place. I also saw it unexpectedly in the morning (on Corporation Street) but couldn't see the tram number.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Now at 1,100 followers. Thank you.

Birmingham We Are People with Passion award winner 2020

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50 passion points
Squares and public spaces
28 Feb 2020 - Elliott Brown
Inspiration

Centenary Square lit up after dark with the Water Jet fountains

Heading back into town from The BCAG, got these views of Centenary Square around 7pm on Wednesday 26th February 2020. Been wanting to see the Water Jet fountains lit up after it got dark. Was very quiet in Centenary Square. Crossing over Library Tram Stop, as roadworks on Broad Street mean you can't walk down past Symphony Hall. Westside seemed quiet for this time of the evening.

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Centenary Square lit up after dark with the Water Jet fountains





Heading back into town from The BCAG, got these views of Centenary Square around 7pm on Wednesday 26th February 2020. Been wanting to see the Water Jet fountains lit up after it got dark. Was very quiet in Centenary Square. Crossing over Library Tram Stop, as roadworks on Broad Street mean you can't walk down past Symphony Hall. Westside seemed quiet for this time of the evening.


Heading out of Brindleyplace, and back onto Broad Street. I headed to Centenary Square sometime after 7pm, after leaving a Birmingham We Are arts event at The Birmingham Contemporary Art Gallery. Hoardings on Broad Street, means you have to cross over to the side near Regency Wharf and the Hyatt Regency Birmingham Hotel.

Crossing over Library Tram Stop.

The water jets in the Reflective Pool were lit up red at this point while the Library of Birmingham was blue.

The blue lights were making nice reflections here.

The water jets going up giving off an unique blue tint.

Between the Library of Birmingham and HSBC UK. Looks quite complete from here.

View to HSBC UK at 1 Centenary Square with the Municipal Bank and 3 Arena Central.

Tram 23 was heading into Library Tram Stop. Passing the Municipal Bank, future home of a University of Birmingham venue.

Tram 23 comes to a stop at Library Tram Stop. Making a nice reflection from this side.

View towards the Symphony Hall foyer and the Hyatt Regency Birmingham.

Further down as you have the tram on the left and the Library to the right.

Might as well get Baskerville House and the Hall of Memory again while I passed through.

Tram 23 passed the Alpha Tower and HSBC UK as I headed towards Centenary Way, Chamberlain Square and Victoria Square.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Now at 1,100 followers. Thank you.

Birmingham We Are People with Passion award winner 2020

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60 passion points
Civic pride
26 Feb 2020 - Elliott Brown
Did you know?

Frederick G. Burnaby: a candidate for a Birmingham MP in 1880 who has an obelisk in Cathedral Square

Have you seen a large obelisk in Cathedral Square near Birmingham Cathedral? It is in memory of Frederick G. Burnaby, a one time Conservative Party candidate to be an MP in Birmingham (in 1880 but he lost). Who died in 1885 at the Battle of Abu Klea, Sudan. The obelisk is close to Temple Row. One side says Khiva 1875 and the other Abu Klea 1885.

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Frederick G. Burnaby: a candidate for a Birmingham MP in 1880 who has an obelisk in Cathedral Square





Have you seen a large obelisk in Cathedral Square near Birmingham Cathedral? It is in memory of Frederick G. Burnaby, a one time Conservative Party candidate to be an MP in Birmingham (in 1880 but he lost). Who died in 1885 at the Battle of Abu Klea, Sudan. The obelisk is close to Temple Row. One side says Khiva 1875 and the other Abu Klea 1885.


Have you ever seen this obelisk in Cathedral Square near Birmingham Cathedral (with the church grounds of St Philip's Cathedral Birmingham) and wondered who it is for? For a war that no one remembers from the late 19th century.

It is in memory of Frederick Burnaby. Born in Bedford on the 3rd March 1842. He died at Abu Klea, Sudan on the 17th January 1885 (aged 42). He had various military adventures overseas including in the Khanate of Khiva during March 1875. He unsuccessfully stood as a Conservative Party candidate to be an Member of Parliament for Birmingham in 1880. His second attempt in 1885 was also unsuccessful (he died in January 1885 and the election was between November and December 1885 so he couldn't had stood, but he must have hoped to be a candidate again in 1884 before he was killed in action). In the 1880 election, the Liberal Party won three seats including John Bright and Joseph Chamberlain. It was a Liberal hold.

The obelisk was unveiled by Lord Charles Beresford on the 13th November 1885. It is a tall Portland stone obelisk, and contins the inscriptions "Khiva 1875" and "Abu Klea 1885" as well as a portrait bust.

The Burnaby obelisk is Grade II lised. It has been listed since 1970.

 

My earliest photos of the Burnaby obelisk was taken during May 2009. This view towards Birmingham Cathedral, with the dome on the left.

Close up of the portrait bust of Frederick Burnaby. Most people just pass this and wouldn't even know who this Victorian man even was!

Not taken many recent photos of the obelisk over the years since, I mostly pass through without getting new photos of it. In May 2017 the flags were at half mast after the Manchester Terror Attack at the Manchester Arena (22nd May 2017). The Burnaby obelisk is seen here between the Union Jack and England flag. This was around a week after that attack.

Seen during Early November 2019 from Temple Row. There was leaves on the lawn in Cathedral Square. The Burnaby obelisk seen to the right while the Cathedral was to the left.

Some new photos of the Burnaby obelisk taken in February 2020, as I was thinking of doing this post. This view towards Temple Row. It says Burnaby on this side. There is now plants planted at the bottom on all sides of the obelisk.

Close up of Burnaby. Could do with a clean up at the bottom of the obelisk.

Khiva 1875. You can see the new 103 Colmore Row rising on the right.

Abu Klea 1885. This was where Frederick Burnaby died. Hence he never lived to stand for a second time as a Birmingham Conservative MP. Although the Liberal's won again near the end of 1885, there was more than one Birmingham seat. This view towards St Philip's Place.

In the end the obelisk was unveiled a few weeks before the 1885 General Election. And it's been on this spot for almost 135 years.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Now at 1,100 followers. Thank you.

Birmingham We Are People with Passion award winner 2020

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70 passion points
Green open spaces
25 Feb 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

Salford Park: home of the Aston Reservoir, near Spaghetti Junction

My visit to Salford Park was near the end of December 2016. The park is near the Lichfield Road in Aston, and is next to the M6 motorway and Spaghetti Junction. The River Tame flows to the north of this park, which is mostly just the Reservoir. The Cross City Line to Lichfield is also nearby as well as the Tame Valley Canal. Not forgetting Star City. You might see the reservoir from the M6

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Salford Park: home of the Aston Reservoir, near Spaghetti Junction





My visit to Salford Park was near the end of December 2016. The park is near the Lichfield Road in Aston, and is next to the M6 motorway and Spaghetti Junction. The River Tame flows to the north of this park, which is mostly just the Reservoir. The Cross City Line to Lichfield is also nearby as well as the Tame Valley Canal. Not forgetting Star City. You might see the reservoir from the M6


My visit to Salford Park was on the 30th December 2016. I had got the train on the Chase Line to Walsall. Coming back I got off at Aston, and walked up the Lichfield Road to check out the park, reservoir, and then head under Spaghetti Junction on a section of the Tame Valley Canal.

 

For my other park posts (of parks that are near the M6), please check out: Witton Lakes Park and Brookvale Park.

 

There is a Wikipedia page about the Aston Reservoir.

Aston Reservoir has also been known as either: Salford Lake, Salford Park Pool or Salford Bridge Reservoir. It was a 19th century reservoir, formerly used for drinking water extracted from the River Tame. It was built by the Birmingham Waterworks Company, which at the time was in the parish of Aston. On the 1st January 1876 the company was bought by the Birmingham Corporation Water Department

In recent years, the reservoir has been using as a boating lake, but that is no longer the case. It was used for speedboat racing in the 1950s.

 

My first view of Salford Park from the Lichfield Road. Behind is the Aston Expressway, A38(M), with the lanes from the Gravelly Hill Interchange (Spaghetti Junction). That bridge goes over the River Tame.

This old Birmingham City Council sign from the Department of Recreation and Community Services. Calling the park: Salford Park and Stadium.

Powerleague Birmingham is based at these football pitches to the left of the main entrance. Aston Expressway and the lanes from Spaghetti Junction seen behind.

This Power League sign was seen from the Lichfield Road. The main entrance to the park is to the left of here.

Trees in the park. From here I saw an abandoned crashed car. Would assume that officers from Birmingham City Council removed it during January 2017.

More trees in the park. The park is morethe reservoir than trees and grass.

Entering the park, I think the two men (at the time) were fishing in the reservoir. Bollards prevents cars getting in, but as I headed into the park, I saw an abandoned crashed car (windows all smashed).

Heading around the reservoir towards the River Tame. A lorry is seen heading onto the Aston Expressway.

The east end of the reservoir is quite curved here. As you see the Aston Expressway heading into the City Centre. Mostly from here the lanes coming in from the M6 at Junction 6.

One more view of the reservoir from this side before heading to the Tame Valley Canal.

This path is between the Aston Expressway and the River Tame. I went out of the park, and back onto the Lichfield Road, and got onto the Tame Valley Canal from the Salford Bridge.

A look at the Salford Bridge at the point where it crosses the River Tame. With the M6 going over it. To get onto the Tame Valley Canal you have to go up to the bridge, then down the towpath at the Canalside Walk.

A look at the Salford Bridge at the exit from Salford Park (to the right). The towpath to the canal was accessed from near the bridge.

This view of the M6 from Salford Park. You can see the River Tame in front.

Now on the Salford Bridge as I headed to the Canalside Walk entrance for the Tame Valley Canal under the M6.

Reflections of the concrete columns seen in the River Tame from the Salford Bridge. That's the M6 up there.

Under the M6 and between the River Tame and Tame Valley Canal. Not much to see here other than the concrete columsn and those metals bars near the metal fences.

View from the Salford Bridge of the Tame Valley Canal, it wasn't until I went down that I saw youths riding motorbikes illegally up and down the towpath (which was intimidating and very unsafe).

Heading down the ramp, a look at the Salford Bridge. I think the youths were up that way under the M6. I turned onto the towpath and headed to the left.

Now on the towpath of the Tame Valley Canal. The bridge ahead carries the A5127 Gravelly Hill towards the A38(M) Aston Expressway. A slip road from the Tyburn Road also heads in that direction.

Under the bridge, there was graffiti on the other side. Including something that Bill Drummond had done. I expect that all of this graffiti has changed in the following 3 years.

It was a bit like a long tunnel with open concrete columns on the right. Like a bit of a silhouette. Daylight ahead.

Under Spaghetti Junction as the M6 was on the left and a southbound slip road from the Aston Expressway, A38(M) was on the right. Looks a bit weird from down here.

Under another bridge, probably a slip road leading from Salford Circus onto the M6 northbound.

I think that's now the M6 heading to the right. Beyond was railway bridges for the Cross City Line, between Aston and Gravelly Hill stations.

Getting off the Tame Valley Canal, I found a path that led back towards Salford Park. More slip roads of Spaghetthi Junction above with an old bridge railway bridge carrying the Cross City Line towards Lichfield. I think the slip road on the left is coming off the Aston Expressway, A38(M) onto the M6 Northbound, while the slip road on the right is coming from Salford Circus.

Now following the path back to Salford Park under the Aston Expressway, A38(M), from the slip road coming off the M6 Northbound and Southbound. Salford Park would be to the left over a bridge that crosses the River Tame. Area on the right fenced off with work vans.

Heading back into Salford Park after my short walk down the Tame Valley Canal. The path went between the Cross City Line and some of the lanes linked to the Aston Expressway. Leading to this footbridge over the River Tame.

With the River Tame to the right and the Aston Expressway to the left, I was heading back into Salford Park which was over to the right.

Now back in Salford Park with the Aston Expressway to the left and Aston Reservoir to the right. There is a path to the north side of the reservoir, but I think at the time I didn't walk up it, having just come off the Tame Valley Canal under the Motorways.

Aston Reservoir from the west end of the park. Aston Expressway in the distance.

Geese and gulls in the reservoir.

The south west corner of Aston Reservoir, with the Aston Expressway to the left. After this, I followed a path out of Salford Park, and headed back to Aston Station to catch a train back to Birmingham New Street. The wasteland I saw 3 years ago, has now since been built on. You can also get the 65 or 67 buses up to Salford Park if you want to explore this park and the canals.

This was the view from the National Express West Midlands Platinum bus on the X5 I caught from Erdington back in January 2019. Heading along the Aston Expressway between Gravelly Hill and Aston.

From the bus you can see Salford Park and the Aston Reservoir, while above is the lanes coming off the M6, Junction 6, which links to the Aston Expressway, A38(M). Both from southbound and northbound lanes joining up.

Scaffolding under Spaghetti Junction. You have to remember that it was completed way back in 1972, and in recent years engineers have had to repair the concrete columns and the structure carrying the road above.

On the coach during September 2019, we were heading back into Birmingham from Cheltenham and Broadway (after a riding on the Gloucestershire Warwickshire Steam Railway). See my post on that here: Gloucestershire Warwickshire Steam Railway from Cheltenham Race Course to Broadway. The coach driver took a weird route heading back into Birmingham, leaving the A435 and heading on the M42 towards the M6. Only getting off at Spaghetti Junction. I saw the Aston Reservoir in Salford Park from the coach, a long with the Birmingham skyline (to the left).

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Now at 1,100 followers. Thank you.

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