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Elliott Brown History & heritage
22 Feb 2021 - Elliott Brown
Did you know?

A visit to Dudmaston Estate during October 2020

The last National Trust property visit of 2020 was to Dudmaston Estate in October 2020. It's in Shropshire. A 17th Century country house (not open apart from a gallery inside). Near the village of Quatt. As before booked the tickets online for a slot. The grounds you could walk about and explore. Tea Room was open, but you had to have your tea or coffee at picnic tables outside.

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A visit to Dudmaston Estate during October 2020





The last National Trust property visit of 2020 was to Dudmaston Estate in October 2020. It's in Shropshire. A 17th Century country house (not open apart from a gallery inside). Near the village of Quatt. As before booked the tickets online for a slot. The grounds you could walk about and explore. Tea Room was open, but you had to have your tea or coffee at picnic tables outside.


Dudmaston

The National Trust property of Dudmaston is located near the village of Quatt in Shropshire. The country house dates to the 17th century. There is former farm buildings, some of which have been converted into a tea room and second hand book shop. There was a gallery you could visit (sanitise your hands before going in), but no photography allowed inside for copyright reasons (I think the family still live in the house). Tickets and time slot as before booked via the National Trust website (with tickets on EventBrite). If there was a gift shop, I think it was closed.

This visit was on the 18th October 2020 (so was about half a month before the second lockdown began).

 

Outbuildings at Dudmaston

The Outbuildings from the lawn. Near here was picnic tables. A queue for the toilets, sanitise your hands, wer your mask if you go in.

dndimg alt="Dudmaston" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Dudmaston Estate (Oct 2020) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

A courtyard near the Outbuildings. All the rooms here were closed. There was a one way system in place, so if you wanted, you could enter the gardens from this gate on the right.

dndimg alt="Dudmaston" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Dudmaston Estate (Oct 2020) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

The Outbuildings from the garden. Due to the one way system in place, if you went out of the garden, then back in, you had to head this way to get out.

dndimg alt="Dudmaston" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Dudmaston Estate (Oct 2020) (13).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

This gate to the courtyard looked nice, but it was no entry this way (you could only walk through them from the other direction).

dndimg alt="Dudmaston" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Dudmaston Estate (Oct 2020) (14).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Private garden seen over the fence from the Kitchen Garden. Far end of the Outbuildings.

dndimg alt="Dudmaston" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Dudmaston Estate (Oct 2020) (15).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />
 

Dudmaston Hall

Round the back of Dudmaston Hall. A tent with National Trust volunteer, to register you before going into the exhibition / gallery. Sanitise your hands again, mask on. No photos allowed inside (tempting as it was).

dndimg alt="Dudmaston" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Dudmaston Estate (Oct 2020) (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

The back of Dudmaston Hall. It is a Grade II* listed building. A Queen Anne mansion. Built of red brick with stone dressings. Was also a 19th Century office and stable wing built in the Elizabethan style. Couldn't cross the rope on the left.

dndimg alt="Dudmaston" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Dudmaston Estate (Oct 2020) (5).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Heading down the hill, a look at Dudmaston Hall, an impresive looking house.

dndimg alt="Dudmaston" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Dudmaston Estate (Oct 2020) (8).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

There was this Red Ivy going down the house. A bit like those poppy art installations around Remembrance time. Some old steps with urns.

dndimg alt="Dudmaston" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Dudmaston Estate (Oct 2020) (9).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Another view of the house with the Red Ivy in the middle.

dndimg alt="Dudmaston" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Dudmaston Estate (Oct 2020) (11).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

The Red Ivy looked wonderful from any angle in the parkland.

dndimg alt="Dudmaston" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Dudmaston Estate (Oct 2020) (12).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

You could have a walk around the Dingle Walk. Eventually you would end up at the back of the Big Pool, with this wonderful picturesque view of Dudmaston Hall.

dndimg alt="Dudmaston" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Dudmaston Estate (Oct 2020) (18).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Parkland and gardens

A look down to the Big Pool at Dudmaston Estate.

dndimg alt="Dudmaston" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Dudmaston Estate (Oct 2020) (4).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Sculpture in the garden, part of a trail. Spaceframe sculpted by Anthony Twentyman during 1985.

dndimg alt="Dudmaston" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Dudmaston Estate (Oct 2020) (6).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Seated bench area for relaxing and looking at the views of the picturesque parkland.

dndimg alt="Dudmaston" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Dudmaston Estate (Oct 2020) (7).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Greylag geese flying and landing in the Big Pool.

dndimg alt="Dudmaston" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Dudmaston Estate (Oct 2020) (10).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

The Kitchen Garden. Pumpkins in the greenhouse before Halloween.

dndimg alt="Dudmaston" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Dudmaston Estate (Oct 2020) (16).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Fingerpost on the Dingle Walk. Head right to the Garden, or left to the Dingle Walk.

dndimg alt="Dudmaston" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Dudmaston Estate (Oct 2020) (17).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Kept spotting this brick boathouse near the Big Pool, although didn't see any boats in the lake.

dndimg alt="Dudmaston" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Dudmaston Estate (Oct 2020) (19).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

The South Lodge seen from the car as we left Dudmaston Estate. Now a private house. A Grade II listed building dating to the early 19th Century. Made of coursed sandstone rubble, with a tiled roof. The gate on exiting the estate was an automatic electric gate.

dndimg alt="Dudmaston" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Dudmaston Estate (Oct 2020) (20).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Hope to visit more National Trust properties in 2021, after the 3rd lockdown ends, if we are allowed to travel far again. Especially in the Spring or Summer months.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown. Can be found on Twitter: ellrbrown

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70 passion points
Elliott Brown Art; Culture & creativity
17 Feb 2021 - Elliott Brown
Inspiration

The Floral Trail and The Big Hoot in Centenary Square

Taking Centenary Square back in time. The Birmingham City Centre Floral Trail pieces in the square in the summers from 2010 and 2016 (most of which won gold at Chelsea). Also the owls of The Big Hoot over the summer of 2015. The Big Sleuth didn't have any bears in the square during the summer of 2017 due to the renovation works in the square (which didn't finish until 2019).

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The Floral Trail and The Big Hoot in Centenary Square





Taking Centenary Square back in time. The Birmingham City Centre Floral Trail pieces in the square in the summers from 2010 and 2016 (most of which won gold at Chelsea). Also the owls of The Big Hoot over the summer of 2015. The Big Sleuth didn't have any bears in the square during the summer of 2017 due to the renovation works in the square (which didn't finish until 2019).


Birmingham City Centre Floral Trail

Birmingham Parks & Nurseries (aka Cofton Nursery) have over the years been making floral trail pieces to go on display in the City Centre every summer. But first they take the main display to the Chelsea Flower Show and Gardeners World Live, where they usually win the Gold prize. These are the floral trail features spotted over the years in Centenary Square.

Living Wall, Summer 2010

In the summer of 2010 there was the Living Wall on the hoardings of the Library of Birmingham construction site. Around July 2010, the wall was half complete at the time.

dndimg alt="Floral Trail Centenary Square" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Living Wall Cent Sq (Jul 2010).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Another look at the Living Wall in August 2010, towards the Hyatt Hotel. You can see the former Municipal Bank on the left.

dndimg alt="Floral Trail Centenary Square" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Living Wall Cent Sq (Aug 2010) (1).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

The Living Wall remained in place for the rest of summer 2010, before it was moved to a more permanent location (there is now permanent living walls at Aston University, Birmingham New Street Station and Birmingham Snow Hill Station, but not sure where it went).

dndimg alt="Floral Trail Centenary Square" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Living Wall Cent Sq (Aug 2010) (2).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

The Plight of the Gorilla, Summer 2011

Seen outside of the Library of Birmingham construction site hoardings was The Plight of the Gorilla. Seen during July 2011. It won Silver at the Chelsea Flower Show and Gold at Gardeners World Live in 2011.

dndimg alt="Gorilla Centenary Square" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Gorilla Plight Cent Sq (Jul 2011) (1).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

At the top was a sculpture of a gorilla.

dndimg alt="Gorilla Centenary Square" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Gorilla Plight Cent Sq (Jul 2011) (2).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

Below the gorilla was a waterfall over a rock garden.

dndimg alt="Gorilla Centenary Square" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Gorilla Plight Cent Sq (Jul 2011) (3).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

The water was flowing down the waterfall below the gorilla.

dndimg alt="Gorilla Centenary Square" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Gorilla Plight Cent Sq (Jul 2011) (4).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

It was very impressive to see, the flowers and plants around it looked nice as well.

dndimg alt="Gorilla Centenary Square" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Gorilla Plight Cent Sq (Jul 2011) (5).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

The Best of Birmingham, Summer 2012

After winning Gold at the Chelsea Flower Show, and Gold and Best of Show at Gardeners World Live in 2012, this floral feature from Birmingham City Council called The Best of Birmingham, was split in two. One half in Centenary Square featured a Mini, a Silver Spoon and Birmingham Town Hall. The other half was in St Martin's Square at the Bullring and included the Bullring Bull, Selfridges and the Birmingham canals with a narrowboat. Seen here during August 2012 next to the Library of Birmingham (about a year before it opened to the public).

dndimg alt="Best of Birmingham Centenary Square" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Best of Bham 1 Cent Sq (Aug 2012) (1).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

A close up of the Mini, covered all over with a floral skin. It was later displayed at Longbridge Island over August 2013, for Birmingham's entry into the Entente Florale Europe 2013.

dndimg alt="Best of Birmingham Centenary Square" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Best of Bham 1 Cent Sq (Aug 2012) (2).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

The silver spoon acted as a fountain, and probably represented the Jewellery Quarter.

dndimg alt="Best of Birmingham Centenary Square" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Best of Bham 1 Cent Sq (Aug 2012) (3).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

Plenty of colourful flowers around this section. You can see why Birmingham win's Gold every year at Chelsea!

dndimg alt="Best of Birmingham Centenary Square" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Best of Bham 1 Cent Sq (Aug 2012) (4).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Enlightenment, Summer 2013

As the Library of Birmingham got ready to open in September 2013, around August 2013, you could see pieces from a floral trail feature called Enlightenment. Which included models of The Two Towers (Perrott's Folly and the Edgbaston Waterworks Tower) plus a deckchair. As well as being part of Summer 2013's City Centre Floral Trail, it was also part of Birmingham's entry into the Entente Florale Europe 2013.

Here you could see the metal sculpture of the Edgbaston Waterworks Tower, as it looks like a man walking past Baskerville House was dressed as Spider-Man!

dndimg alt="Enlightenment Centenary Square" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Two Towers Cent Sq (Jul 2013) (1).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

This view of the model of the Edgbaston Waterworks Tower towards The Library of Birmingham.

dndimg alt="Enlightenment Centenary Square" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Two Towers Cent Sq (Jul 2013) (2).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

There was lots of summery flowers around in the landscaped garden in front of the new library.

dndimg alt="Enlightenment Centenary Square" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Two Towers Cent Sq (Jul 2013) (3).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

Also the model of Perrott's Folly towards The Library of Birmingham.

dndimg alt="Enlightenment Centenary Square" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Two Towers Cent Sq (Jul 2013) (4).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

View of the Two Towers in the garden outside of the new Library. These days you can find the models at Sarehole Mill. But in the late summer of 2013 you could see them with the Hyatt Hotel and Symphony Hall.

dndimg alt="Enlightenment Centenary Square" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Two Towers Cent Sq (Jul 2013) (5).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

Boulton, Watt & Murdoch could be seen with the Edgbaston Waterworks Tower. All this seen over fences, as the Library and the landscaped grounds wouldn't open until early September 2013.

dndimg alt="Enlightenment Centenary Square" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Two Towers Cent Sq (Jul 2013) (6).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

View of Perrott's Folly towards The ICC, The REP and the Library of Birmingham.

dndimg alt="Enlightenment Centenary Square" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Two Towers Cent Sq (Jul 2013) (7).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

The deckchair was covered in the same floral material as the Mini was the year before.

dndimg alt="Enlightenment Centenary Square" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Deckchair Cent Sq (Jul 2013).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

City of Birmingham Ambulance Train, Summer 2014

August 2014 marked the 100th Anniversary of the start of the First World War, so Cofton Nursery that summer had a trailer of features around the City Centre commemorating Britain's entry into that war. Outside of the Library of Birmingham seen in July 2014 was this floral feature of a train. From the view below you can see the link from The REP to the Library of Birmingham.

dndimg alt="City of Birmingham train Centenary Square" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/CoBA train Cent Sq (Jul 2014) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

This view of the train towards the Library of Birmingham and Baskerville House.

dndimg alt="City of Birmingham train Centenary Square" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/CoBA train Cent Sq (Jul 2014) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Behind the train was the landscaped garden in front of the Library. It lasted from 2013 to 2017 before being removed. The Hall of Memory to the left. The floral train was later placed outside Birmingham Snow Hill Station in the summer of 2015 (the public square near Colmore Row).

dndimg alt="City of Birmingham train Centenary Square" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/CoBA train Cent Sq (Jul 2014) (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Skull and a Book, Summer 2016

The last floral trail piece to be in Centenary Square was this outside of the Library of Birmingham. Resembled a skull with an open book in front of it. The grass behind hadn't faired to well between 2013 and 2017, and would be removed in the 2017 renovation works of the square.

dndimg alt="Skull Book Centenary Square" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Skull book Cent Sq (Jul 2016) (1).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

This would be the last floral trail piece to be in the square before the square was revamped from 2017 to 2019. At least in a summer.

dndimg alt="Skull Book Centenary Square" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Skull book Cent Sq (Jul 2016) (2).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

The Mo Bot, Winter 2018

This is a bonus one. When the World Indoor Athletics Championships came to Arena Birmingham in March 2018, Cofton Nursery got their wicker sculptures out (no flowers). Was strange seeing them in the winter with snow on them. The Mo Bot, based on Mo Farah, was seen in Centenary Square (closed to the Edward VII statue), while the square was in it's second year of renovation works. This February 2018 view as it was snowing.

dndimg alt="Mo Bot Centenary Square" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Mo Bot Cent Sq (Feb 2018).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

By March 2018, after the WIAC had ended, I saw workers removing The Mo Bot and putting it on the back of a lorry. They had two small lorries. One to take the soil away, the other to remove the wicker sculpture.

dndimg alt="Mo Bot removal" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Mo Bot Cent Sq (Mar 2018) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

The zoom ins from the Library of Birmingham. Already on the back of this lorry was the Usian Bolt wicker sculpture, originally made in 2012, for their London 2012 floral trail. It had been taken down from Victoria Square (was in front of the Town Hall at the time).

dndimg alt="Mo Bot removal" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Mo Bot Cent Sq (Mar 2018) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Two Council workmen digging up the soil, while another prepares the Mo Farah sculpture for removal.

dndimg alt="Mo Bot removal" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Mo Bot Cent Sq (Mar 2018) (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Just a pair of red shorts, the purple t-shirt had already gone.

dndimg alt="Mo Bot removal" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Mo Bot Cent Sq (Mar 2018) (4).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

 

The Big Hoot Birmingham 2015

Now onto The Big Hoot. In Centenary Square there was about 5 Big Hoot painted owls from July 2015, for around 10 weeks. Before they were auctioned off for the Birmingham Children's Hospital Charity.

Jack

Located outside of the Hall of Memory was Jack. It was by the artist Martin Band. And was sponsored by JLT Specialty Limited. Seen during July 2015.

dndimg alt="Big Hoot Centenary Square" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Big Hoot Cent Sq (Jul 2015) (2).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

Jack was designed by the Union Jack (the British National flag).

dndimg alt="Big Hoot Centenary Square" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Big Hoot Cent Sq (Jul 2015) (3).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

He had the Union Jack on the back as well.

dndimg alt="Big Hoot Centenary Square" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Big Hoot Cent Sq (Jul 2015) (1).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Wise Old Owl

This Wise Old Owl was designed by the artists Kieron Reilly and Lynsey Brecknell. The sponsor was Gateley Plc. They designed it to look like the Library of Birmingham (which you can see behind). Seen during July 2015.

dndimg alt="Big Hoot Centenary Square" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Big Hoot Cent Sq (Jul 2015) (4).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

It closely matches the golds and blues of the Library, plus the silvers and blacks of the circles.

dndimg alt="Big Hoot Centenary Square" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Big Hoot Cent Sq (Jul 2015) (5).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

TropicOwl

The owl named TropicOwl was painted by the artist Jenny Leonard. The sponsor was Twycross Zoo. Resembles a jungle with chimpanzees. Seen during July 2015 outside of the Library of Birmingham.

 

dndimg alt="Big Hoot Centenary Square" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Big Hoot Cent Sq (Jul 2015) (6).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

At the back was more features of a jungle, plus giraffes in a desert. This view to Baskerville House.

dndimg alt="Big Hoot Centenary Square" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Big Hoot Cent Sq (Jul 2015) (7).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Owlbert

The owl called Owlbert was painted by the artist Meghan Allbright. The sponsor was University College Birmingham. Seen outside the Library of Birmingham during July 2015.

dndimg alt="Big Hoot Centenary Square" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Big Hoot Cent Sq (Jul 2015) (8).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

This view towards Symphony Hall, The ICC and The REP. It was a rainy day that I saw these owls.

dndimg alt="Big Hoot Centenary Square" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Big Hoot Cent Sq (Jul 2015) (9).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Welcome to Birmingham

Outside of Symphony Hall in Centenary Square was an owl called Welcome to Birmingham. Painted by the artist Laura Hallett. The sponsor was Pertemps Network. Seen during August 2015, with a reflection of the Library of Birmingham and The REP.

dndimg alt="Big Hoot Centenary Square" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Big Hoot Cent Sq (Aug 2015) (1).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

The design featured, Selfridges, the Library of Birmingham, the canals and more.

dndimg alt="Big Hoot Centenary Square" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Big Hoot Cent Sq (Aug 2015) (2).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Bonus content on Centenary Way

Back in Febrauary 2013 there was a trail for one week called The Big Egg Hunt. These same eggs went from City to City. Two eggs were on Centenary Way at the time.

The first egg resembled the Rocket Ship from Wallace & Gromit's A Grand Day Out. Seen towards the Hall of Memory.

dndimg alt="Big Egg Hunt Centenary Way" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Big Egg Hunt Cent Sq (Feb 2013) (1).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

The charity at the time was Action for Children. The next egg was behind, on the way to the Hall of Memory.

dndimg alt="Big Egg Hunt Centenary Way" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Big Egg Hunt Cent Sq (Feb 2013) (2).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

The second egg on Centenary Way was of Ben 10 Omniverse, close to Chamberlain House (demolished in 2018).

dndimg alt="Big Egg Hunt Centenary Way" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Big Egg Hunt Cent Sq (Feb 2013) (3).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

The Big Sleuth did not come to Centenary Square, for obvious reasons in 2017, as that's when they began revamping the square, but there was one bear on Centenary Way near Paradise Birmingham.

 

Memoirs of Paradise

This Big Sleuth bear was on Centenary Way, close to the One Chamberlain Square construction site of Paradise Birmingham. Memoirs of Paradise was painted by the artist Gayani Ariyarante. The sponsor was Paradise. Seen during July 2017. Shows what a real paradise looks like! By August 2017, someone had knocked this one over, and they had to remove and repair it, before putting it back in it's place.

dndimg alt="Big Sleuth Centenary Way" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Paradise bear Cent Way (Jul 2017).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

There was more to be found in the Library of Birmingham, 4 little owls in 2015 and 4 little bears in 2017. There was a Big Hoot owl inside of The ICC mall, and another outside at the canalside (in 2015). Plus a Big Sleuth bear at canalside (in 2017).

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown. Can be found on Twitter: ellrbrown

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80 passion points
Elliott Brown History & heritage
03 Feb 2021 - Elliott Brown
Did you know?

The Lapworth Museum of Geology at the University of Birmingham

If you miss seeing dinosaur skeletons and fossils at Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery, why not give the Lapworth Museum of Geology a try? It's free to enter and located at the University of Birmingham in the Aston Webb Building (Quadrant Range). The museum dates back to 1880 (when at Mason College), but has been on this site since the 1920s. Named after Charles Lapworth.

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The Lapworth Museum of Geology at the University of Birmingham





If you miss seeing dinosaur skeletons and fossils at Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery, why not give the Lapworth Museum of Geology a try? It's free to enter and located at the University of Birmingham in the Aston Webb Building (Quadrant Range). The museum dates back to 1880 (when at Mason College), but has been on this site since the 1920s. Named after Charles Lapworth.


Lapworth Museum of Geology

The Lapworth Museum of Geology is hidden away to the back of the Quadrant Range at the University of Birmingham. Located near Ring Road South.

 

History of the Lapworth Museum of Geology

The Lapworth Museum of Geology is a geological museum at the University of Birmingham. It was named after the Professor of Geology, Charles Lapworth, with origins dating back to 1880 (when the Geology Department was a Mason College, then located in Chamberlain Square). The museum has been located at the Grade II* listed Aston Webb Building (designed by Sir Aston Webb and Ingress Bell and built from 1900 to 1909) on the Edgbaston Campus of the University of Birmingham since the 1920s. The museum was redeveloped from 2014 and reopened in 2016.

I saw this history board below during my visit in June 2018. The image showing Mason College. Sadly the building was demolished in the 1960s to make way for Birmingham Central Library (which opened in 1974, closed in 2013 and was demolished itself in 2016).

dndimg alt="Lapworth Museum of Geology" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/History Lapworth Museum (Jun 2018).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

In July 2017, I got my first photos of the Lapworth Museum of Geology, but didn't go in at the time. It is an impressive looking building to house the museum.

dndimg alt="Lapworth Museum of Geology" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Lapworth Museum Geology (Jul 2017) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

There is a pair of blue plaques here from the University of Birmingham, one for Frederick Shotton, who furthered understanding of climate change 1949-1974.

dndimg alt="Lapworth Museum of Geology" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Lapworth Museum Geology (Jul 2017) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Also a blue plaque for Charles Lapworth, who undertook pioneering work into the formation of mountain belts 1882-1883.

dndimg alt="Lapworth Museum of Geology" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Lapworth Museum Geology (Jul 2017) (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

This is the modern door that welcomes you to the Lapworth Museum. At the time I was on the hunt for the Big Sleuth bears located around the University grounds, so didn't end up going into the museum until about a year later.

dndimg alt="Lapworth Museum of Geology" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Lapworth Museum Geology (Jul 2017) (4).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

About 11 months later in June 2018, I was inspired to visit the Lapworth Museum of Geology after seeing Dippy on Tour at the Gas Hall, Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery.

A sign pointing the way on campus to the Lapworth Museum of Geology. Looks like it is being held in place by a tape with a key!

dndimg alt="Lapworth Museum of Geology" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Lapworth Museum Geology (Jun 2018) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Another Lapworth Museum of Geology sign in the window.

dndimg alt="Lapworth Museum of Geology" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Lapworth Museum Geology (Jun 2018) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

The main reason for this visit was to see the replica skeleton of an Allosaurus.

dndimg alt="Lapworth Museum of Geology" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Allosaurus Lapworth Musuem UoB (June 2018) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

There was also a Pteranodon hanging from the ceiling behind.

dndimg alt="Pteranodon Lapworth Museum of Geology" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Pteranodon Lapworth Museum UoB (Jun 2018) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

To the back of the museum, was all these fossils and rocks in the tables and on the shelves, behind glass windows. The Pteranodon and Allosaurus seen near the front of the museum.

dndimg alt="Lapworth Museum of Geology" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Lapworth Museum (Jun 2018) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

A Portrait of Charles Lapworth, the founder of the museum. Charles Lapworth, LL. D.M. Sc. F.R.S. was the Professor of Geology at Mason College (later University of Birmingham) from 1881-1913. He became Emeritus Professor in 1913. His portrait was presented to the museum by Mr. W. Waters Butler.

dndimg alt="Lapworth Museum of Geology" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Lapworth Museum (Jun 2018) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Death at the end of the Cretaceous


Skull of the dinosaur Deinonychus.

dndimg alt="Lapworth Museum of Geology" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Lapworth Museum (Jun 2018) (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />


Skull of the dinosaur Velociraptor.

dndimg alt="Lapworth Museum of Geology" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Lapworth Museum (Jun 2018) (4).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Foot of the tyrannosaurid dinosaur Albertosaurus.

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Parapuzosia sp. (ammonite).

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Skull of the carnivorous dinosaur Allosaurus fragilis. From the Late Jurassic.

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Skull and jaws of Dimetrodon (synapsid). From the Permian period (before the Triassic).

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Smilodon (sabre-toothed cat) from the Quaternary (Ice Age).

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Active Earth

Globe - Earth's Palaeogeography. These maps show how Earth may have appeared over the last 600 million years.

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Photos taken by Elliott Brown. Can be found on Twitter: ellrbrown

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Elliott Brown History & heritage
01 Feb 2021 - Elliott Brown
Did you know?

The Barber Institute of Fine Arts at the University of Birmingham

Did you know that there is an art gallery at the University of Birmingham? This is the Barber Institute of Fine Arts. Founded in 1932, it's first director was called Thomas Bodkin, who was responsible for purchasing the Equestrian Statue of King George I from the City of Dublin, Ireland in 1937. The gallery is close to Edgbaston Park Road in an Art Deco building completed in 1939.

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The Barber Institute of Fine Arts at the University of Birmingham





Did you know that there is an art gallery at the University of Birmingham? This is the Barber Institute of Fine Arts. Founded in 1932, it's first director was called Thomas Bodkin, who was responsible for purchasing the Equestrian Statue of King George I from the City of Dublin, Ireland in 1937. The gallery is close to Edgbaston Park Road in an Art Deco building completed in 1939.


The Barber Institute of Fine Arts

If you go to the University of Birmingham's main campus in Edgbaston, and head up Edgbaston Park Road from the Bristol Road, you might see the Barber Institute of Fine Arts on the left. It is opposite King Edward's School and King Edward VI High School for Girls. Also near by is the University of Birmingham Guild of Students (BUGS).

 

Some history of the Barber Institute of Fine Arts

The building was built from 1935 to 1939, it was designed by the architect Robert Atkinson. It is now a Grade II listed building. It is an art gallery and concert hall, and is an Art Deco building. It was opened by Queen Mary (the Queen Consort and later widow of King George V of the United Kingdom). It was set up by Martha Constance Hattie Barber, in memory of her late husband Henry Barber. Who was a wealthy property developer in Birmingham's suburbs. He became a baron in 1924. He died three years later. Lady Barber decided to make a permanent contribution to the city in his memory. The Barber Institute of Fine Arts was founded in 1932. The founding director was Thomas Bodkin.

 

I've only been inside once back in 2008, but at the time wasn't allowed to take photos inside the gallery, and I've never been back. But I did get photos of the exterior of the gallery in the snow of December 2009.

First view of the Art Deco building with the Statue of George I in the snow.

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There was a light dusting of snow on the grass around the statue.

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At the time cars were allowed to park outside of the Barber Institute.

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It's lucky that this building was completed before the start of World War 2.

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The building curves around, with unique Art Deco detailing of the 1930s.

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Steps leads to a rear entrance at the back.

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To shields on the building. A Latin motto "Esto Quod Esse Videris". This means in English "Suppose that you are".

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Including the crest of the University of Birmingham.

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Snow on the steps to the main entrance, but at the time this could also have been grit salt.

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The main entrance steps and doorway. Above the doors it says "UNIVERSITY OF BIRMINGHAM BARBER INSTITUTE OF FINE ARTS AD MCMXXXV". This stone would have been laid in 1935, the year that construction of the gallery began (it would be completed by 1939).

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In my subsequent walks around the Edgbaston Campus at the University of Birmingham, I rarely take new photos of the Barber Institute of Fine Arts, but took this pair during one walk in November 2018, heading off the campus via the East Gate.

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There was a sculpture on the wall of a harp. A sign that they also cover music here.

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Equestrian Statue of King George I of Great Britain

George I of Great Britain was King of Great Britain and Ireland from 1714 until his death in 1727. He had come from Hanover in what is now part of Germany, with the title Elector of Hanover. It is unlikely that he would have ever travelled up to the Town of Birmingham at the time.

The statue was bought by the first director of the Barber Institute of Fine Arts, Thomas Bodkin in 1937. It was originally commissioned by the City of Dublin in 1717, and was unveiled in the City in 1722. It was sculpted by the Dutch sculptor John van Nost the Elder. When in the early part of the 20th Century when Ireland was becoming Independent of the UK, and on it's way to form a Republic, the statue could have been destroyed by the Republicans, but thankfully Mr Bodkin bought it and took it to Birmingham. Today it stands just outside of the gallery on the lawn between University Road East, Ring Road North and Edgbaston Park Road.

 

One of the main reasons for coming to the University of Birmingham on a snowy day in December 2009 was to see the Equestrian Statue of George I.

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It is quite impressive, probably the only statue of Birmingham with a King on a horse.

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It is similar to a later statue of George IV that I previously saw in Trafalfar Square, London.

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There is raser sharp spikes all the way around the plinth, to prevent someone climbing up onto the statue.

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It isn't worth trying unless you want to harm yourself.

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George I is looking towards King Edward's School, which moved here in 1936. All of this land was part of the Calthorpe Estates.

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The equestrian statue was in silhouette on this side.

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Back then, I tended to get loads of photos of statues and buildings, when I was new to Birmingham photography.

dndimg alt="George I of Great Britain" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/George I Barber Inst UoB (Dec 2009) (10).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

Photos taken by Elliott Brown. Can be found on Twitter: ellrbrown

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FreeTimePays Art; Culture & creativity
01 Feb 2021 - FreeTimePays
Introducing

'Forward in Unity' mural - Brilliant initiative in so many ways

The 'Forward In Unity’ mural was started on Friday 22nd May 2020. It was completed by artist Gent48 on Monday 1st June 2020. Not only has the project in Digbeth received some fantastic media coverage, it has helped raise awareness of the virus and its devasting impact on the community as well as raising a vast amount for local charities.

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'Forward in Unity' mural - Brilliant initiative in so many ways





The 'Forward In Unity’ mural was started on Friday 22nd May 2020. It was completed by artist Gent48 on Monday 1st June 2020. Not only has the project in Digbeth received some fantastic media coverage, it has helped raise awareness of the virus and its devasting impact on the community as well as raising a vast amount for local charities.


'Forward in Unity' is a great example of how to bring people together in a massive shared effort against a common enemy, as the Covid-19 virus must continue to be regarded.

The project has helped raise awareness.

The 'Forward in Unity' initiative has raised awareness of the virus and brought people together in recognition of the front-line heroes fighting the virus for the protection of our community.

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'Forward in Unity'.  Photography by Paul Cadman.

The project has helped bring people together.

The initiative and the significant coverage it has received has attracted the attention of people, not just in Birmingham but across the UK. 

This and other initiatives all have a vital role in tackling the views of those who, despite clear evidence of the devastation caused by the virus, still act and behave in a way that is not in the interests of their community. 

The project has enthused and inspired others to be creative.

During a time when people have been asked to make huge sacrifices and stay at home, the project and the media coverage received has inspired many to check out their own creativity.

Whether through photography, art, craft-making or the written word, such creativity has become hugely important for people's mental health.   

As an example, the Birmingham Gems Charity Calendar for 2021 dedicated a page on the mural in recognition of the city's amazing artists and creative talent. 

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The project has raised much needed funds for local charities.

Prints of all sizes can be purchased in order to support local charities, 

In addition to the prints, a book in celebration of those behind the initiative and across community has also been produced.

Connect HERE and get hold of your very own print (signed, limited edition or unlimited) or your 'Forward in Unity' book.  Help support local Birmingham charities. 

'Forward in Unity' A0 Limited Edition Print

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'Forward in Unity' Print (A1 or A2)

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'Forward in Unity' Video/Book Folder

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'Forward in Unity' Book (2nd edition)

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Connect HERE to make a donation to Art4Charity and support local charities.

Paul Cadman, one of the founders of Art4Charity, was the inspiration behind the 'Forward in Unity' mural. Paul is active across the City and involves himself in many charities that need our help during these challenging times.

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