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History & heritage
14 Sep 2020 - FreeTimePays
Introducing

Introducing The Library of Birmingham

So much to explore at The Library of Birmingham,  The Library opened in September 2013 and is most certainly an Icon of Birmingham and one of the most photographed places in the City.  

There is so much our community want to share with you so for posts, photography, maps and all things Library of Birmingham take the related link. 

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40 passion points
History & heritage
14 Sep 2020 - Elliott Brown
Inspiration

Objects in cages at the Birmingham Museum Collection Centre

It's Birmingham Heritage Week again, but I'm not likely to go anywhere and most events are online. So lets look back to the Birmingham Museum Collection Centre from two open days I've been to in the past. First room you look around has all these cages with objects to look at. But hard to get your lens behind the bars if you have a big camera. Anything from masks to old cameras.

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Objects in cages at the Birmingham Museum Collection Centre





It's Birmingham Heritage Week again, but I'm not likely to go anywhere and most events are online. So lets look back to the Birmingham Museum Collection Centre from two open days I've been to in the past. First room you look around has all these cages with objects to look at. But hard to get your lens behind the bars if you have a big camera. Anything from masks to old cameras.


Click here for my previous posts from the Birmingham Museum Collection Centre:

 

When you first arrive at 25 Dollman Street in Nechells, the Birmingham Museum Collection Centre. The first room you go into has objects in cages in both the ground floor and the first floor. When taking photos, it is hard to get your lens behind the bars (don't even try), to get an image of the object behind. Many objects from the collection of the Council (now Birmingham Museums Trust), where there is no room at the Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery or at other City museum venues such as Thinktank. Unless they go on a special exhibition at BM & AG.

Open Day on Sunday 13th May 2012

Old toy cars. Possibly part of the collection of Chad Valley of Harborne.

Old helmets. Could be old Policemen helmets.

Ancient Chinese (or Japanese) ceremonial armour .

Very old clocks. Scales at the front.

Model engines.

Collection of old cameras. Pollaroid and Kodak (I think).

Who knows maybe one day your camera will end up in here? Halina in the middle.

Cameras with wooden bodies. These could be well over a century old.

There was a lot of these old cameras.

A coat of arms shield.

Was plenty of old dolls in the cages as well.

More vintage car toys and motorbikes. Some of them ended up in an exhibition at Thinktank. Chad Valley of Harborne.

Up on the first floor. Miniature bust of King Henry VIII and King Charles II.

This was a Ceramic figure of a man.

Open Day on Sunday 16th September 2018

This was on the last day of Birmingham Heritage Week. Where I caught a vintage bus from Snow Hill Queensway to BMCC.

Carrier bag from The Birmingham Shopping Centre. This was what later became The Pallasades (now Grand Central Birmingham).

Cadbury chocolate bars. Dairy Milk, Whole Nut and Fruit & Nut. Probably decades old, so don't eat them!

Was also a couple of old boxes of Cadbury's Roses Chocolates.

Lamp sculptures. Candle stick holders.

Another old clock.

Maquette of the Forward sculpture that used to be in Centenary Square from 1991 until it was burnt by an arsonist in 2003.

Luckily this original Forward maquette by Raymond Mason survives in the cages at BMCC.

Death Mask of Oliver Cromwell.

Bronze bust of Frederic Lord Leighton by Thomas Brock.

Sri Lanka Masks.

There was a wide variety of these Sri Lankan masks in the collection.

This Sri Lankan mask at the back of the cage was quite big.

In here was a ZX Spectrum - ZX Microdrive.

Also a couple of joysticks with a keyboard and mouse.

This is only a small selection. For more photos check out my album on Flickr.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown.

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50 passion points
Environment & green action
10 Sep 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

Scribers Lane Site of Importance to Nature Conservation in the Shire Country Park

Beyond the Trittiford Mill Pool in the Shire Country Park is an area called Scribers Lane. It is designated as a Site of Importance to Nature Conservation (or SINC for short). It runs alongside the River Cole from Scribers Lane near Yardley Wood and Hall Green, and passes through Slade Lane. It ends on the Birmingham / Solihull border at some stepping stones. Two fords also pass through.

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Scribers Lane Site of Importance to Nature Conservation in the Shire Country Park





Beyond the Trittiford Mill Pool in the Shire Country Park is an area called Scribers Lane. It is designated as a Site of Importance to Nature Conservation (or SINC for short). It runs alongside the River Cole from Scribers Lane near Yardley Wood and Hall Green, and passes through Slade Lane. It ends on the Birmingham / Solihull border at some stepping stones. Two fords also pass through.


Scribers Lane in the Shire Country Park

Located near Hall Green and Yardley Wood is the Scribers Lane Site of Importance to Nature Conservation (also called SINC). The site runs alongside the River Cole from Scribers Lane (after the southern end of the Trittiford Mill Pool) then heads south towards Slade Lane. The site continues beyond that towards some stepping stones on a stream. If you cross over them you leave Birmingham for Solihull at Nethercote Gardens (and you can continue your walk towards Mill Lodge Park).

You can get onto Scribers Lane from Baldwins Lane in Hall Green. One end of Baldwins Lane leads to Slade Lane. The Shakespeare Line runs along the eastern side of the site, with two railway bridges that you can walk under. There are fords on Scribers Lane and Slade Lane.

2016

First walk through of Scribers Lane was during May 2016. During the May Day Bank Holiday (a walk that started from the Sarehole Mill Car Park).

Wetland near the footbridge close to Scribers Lane (what the area was named after).

A look at the wetland from the footbridge.

There was what looked like a guillotine lock on the River Cole.

Saw this heron, but the photo was not to clear as my camera focused instead on the branches.

Gates to the woodland walk.

View of the River Cole.

Cut branches to the side of the footpath.

Some planks of wood on a muddy part of the path.

Another view of the River Cole.

Got as far as Slade Lane. The fingerpost was missing the direction signs from here.

2020

A lockdown walk through Scribers Lane during May 2020. This time went further than last time (as far as the stepping stones).

A look at the River Cole from Scribers Lane.

The footbridge again this time everything around was overgrown, apart from the grass that was cut.

Lilies in the River Cole.

The trees on the other side of the river.

Hard to believe that this is in south Birmingham (but it is).

On this tree is a rope that kids can swing over.

Getting to the bridge on Slade Lane. Gate to exit to the left.

This time continued further than last time. The path was dry. May had a heatwave.

Cow parsley growing on both sides of the grass path.

Another view of the River Cole.

Was some nice natural reflections in the River Cole.

Out onto the path to the end of the nature reserve.

The stepping stones. I did stand on them, but didn't cross over the end of May 2020 (from the Nethercote Gardens side).

Close up look at the stepping stones.

That time we turned back towards the Trittiford Mill Pool.

Then back onto the normal path between Slade Lane and Scribers Lane. River Cole on the left.

Saw a red ball in the River Cole with a nice reflection.

Pair of sluice gates on the River Cole.

And the other sluice gate.

Later that month we were back in the Scribers Lane SINC having crossed over the stepping stones (on the walk from Mill Lodge Park).

The heatwave would last until the end of the month.

Blue sky and a lot of long grass.

Was a lot of long grass next to the main path from Slade Lane to Scribers Lane.

Near the end of Scribers Lane.

The guillotine lock again. After this we headed back into Scribers Lane to walk back to Mill Lodge Park.

More views of the River Cole which was quite shallow at the time.

Still cow parsley to see near the River Cole at the time.

One last look at the Scribers Lane area before crossing back over into Solihull. The suburban area near Shirley and Solihull Lodge.

Next post will be the fords on Scribers Lane and Slade Lane.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown.

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60 passion points
Green open spaces
08 Sep 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

Kings Norton Park on the August Bank Holiday Monday

My first walk around Kings Norton Park in many years. This was after visiting West Heath Park for the first time. More people in Kings Norton Park. Kids in the playground / play area, also at the Skate Park. Was also a group of cyclists who I later saw ride past Kings Norton Junction (via the Recreation Ground). Was nice to be back.

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Kings Norton Park on the August Bank Holiday Monday





My first walk around Kings Norton Park in many years. This was after visiting West Heath Park for the first time. More people in Kings Norton Park. Kids in the playground / play area, also at the Skate Park. Was also a group of cyclists who I later saw ride past Kings Norton Junction (via the Recreation Ground). Was nice to be back.


Kings Norton Park

Previous Kings Norton Park post here: Kings Norton Park down the Pershore Road South.

After the walk around West Heath Park, there was time in the morning for another park walk, so next we headed to Kings Norton Park. It's been years since I've last walked around it (at least once). Other than skimming it down the Pershore Road South, Camp Lane or Westhill Road. This time went around the field towards the Skate Park. Briefly left the park for the Kings Norton Recreation Ground and Kings Norton Junction (where the Stratford-on-Avon Canal meets the Worcester & Birmingham Canal). Before later walking back to the park. Earlier in the park I noticed a group of cyclists meeting up. Eight of them later rode through the Recreation Ground towards the canal junction, and I had to wait until they all went past me. Both green spaces are on the Rea Valley Route and National Cycle Network route 5. It was the August Bank Holiday Monday on the 31st August 2020.

 

Starting with crossing this footbridge over a stream (it's not the River Rea). Just at the end of the Shrub Garden.

Saw this NAF (Northfield Arts Forum) sign about Domesday. The art of a stylised letter 'D' was painted by Thelma Coulson.

Looking back at the Shrub Garden towards the playground / play area and car park.

Into the field, and I noticed a lot of kids playing on the Skate Park ramps.

No paths around here so you have to walk over the grass.

The clouds were looking a bit grey, maybe a sign of later rain?

Kids on skateboards, scooters and possibly bikes. Not seen it this busy before.

Just the field and trees.

There was that group of cyclists meeting in Kings Norton Park. They later rode out towards Kings Norton Junction and beyond.

Sign on the Pershore Road South says that Kings Norton Park has been a public park since 1924.

Later heading back into the park after the walk to and from Kings Norton Junction.

The bridge crosses a small stream.

Towards the trees to social distance from people walking their dog.

Saw this sign about the Kings Norton Park Civic Garden.

The Civic Garden leads towards the Pershore Road South entrance. The park exists thanks to the Birmingham Civic Society when they purchased the land in 1920.

Another NAF sign, this time about the Grammar School. Suffragists mid-protest. Painting by Jenny McClaren.

On the footpath in the tree covered canopy. This leads towards Westhill Road.

Looking out over the field towards the playground / play area.

The path continues on to the steps to Westhill Road. This time I left at the end of the path and walked back towards the car park.

A wide open field with trees.

There was more kids playing at this play area, but only a limited number allowed at one time.

There is a small hill with a slide, and a couple of swings.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown.

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60 passion points
Green open spaces
08 Sep 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

Return to the Warley Woods in June 2020

At the beginning of June 2020, we had a walk around Lightwoods Park which continued into the Warley Woods. This time I had a full walk around the woods. Even passed the Visitor Centre (it reopened in late May 2020). But plenty of people out getting their daily exercise. Or looking for those rainbow doors. The golf course was open again as well.

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Return to the Warley Woods in June 2020





At the beginning of June 2020, we had a walk around Lightwoods Park which continued into the Warley Woods. This time I had a full walk around the woods. Even passed the Visitor Centre (it reopened in late May 2020). But plenty of people out getting their daily exercise. Or looking for those rainbow doors. The golf course was open again as well.


Warley Woods

Previous posts from the Warley Woods:

 

Heading up a path from Lightwoods Park towards Lightwoods Hill. We entered the Warley Woods for the next part of this walk. It was early June 2020. First was a walk around the woods going in a anti-clockwise direction. Then crossing through the large open field. After that following the perimeter paths around the golf course (which was open again and members were playing golf once more). There was also some sculptures to see in the woods and I also found the Visitor Centre.

 

First view of the Warley Woods this time from Lightwoods Hill before entering the gate.

Proceeding to walk in the woods off the paths.

Tall trees everywhere.

Back onto the path.

The wide open field. People were either sitting on the grass or having fun.

The gates to the Abbey Road entrance.

Some sculpted wood that looked like sarcophagus's.

Now onto the path that goes around the golf course.

A pair of yellow flags on the Warley Woods Golf Course.

By early June some lockdown restrictions had been eased, this probably included playing golf.

Later saw this Sidewinder lawnmower.

The Visitor Centre near the car park. Both of which are near Lightwoods Hill.

A bench near the golf course, which was close to the Visitor Centre.

The Visitor Centre and shop were reopened on the 21st May 2020.

One last walk into the woods to see some sculptures.

There was these carved stone sculptures to see in the Warley Woods.

Also this area with picnic benches. There was bear sculptures to the back, maybe it was a crazy golf course for kids?

Another set of sculptures, more like carved wooden sculptures.

Another look at the drinking fountain.

Back on the path walking to the exit.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown.

 

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